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The Reformation of Henry VIII.

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Introduction

Introduction: In 1534 Henry passed the Act of Supremacy which made him the Head of the Church. This later changed in England called the Reformation (a 16th century movement for the change of abuses in the Roman Church ending establishment of the reformed and Protestant Churches). This essay will explain this. The Six Wives Henry's first wife was Catherine of Aragon who originally came from Spain, well educated and the youngest daughter of Ferdinand and Isaballa of Castile. But due to the failure of many miscarriages and only bearing one child, a daughter, Mary I (later known as Bloody Mary). Of which he wanted a male heir to obtain the throne; he wished to annul his marriage to Catherine which led eventually to England break with Roman Catholic Church. The English Church was the Catholic Church until the Reformation of the 16th Century: after Henry failed to obtain a divorce form Catherine of Aragon he repudiated papal supremacy, bringing the Church under the Control of the Crown. The Pope, leading to the break with the Roman Catholic Church opposed his divorce form Catherine. ...read more.

Middle

He was convinced that the problem was Catherine's, so he sought to have the marriage annulled in order that he might marry someone new - someone who would produce male children. Henry thought he had a very good argument for annulment, too. After all, he had married his brother's wife against church law, despite the dispensation. This argument might have worked, except for the fact that the pope had important political factors to consider as well. Catherine was the aunt of Charles V, at the time the Holy Roman Emperor whose armies at the time were in control of Italy. Had Henry sent Catherine away as "unsuitable", Charles would have been outraged both at Henry and any pope who allowed it. So, the annulment that was request for political reasons was also denied for political reasons. But Henry was not to be deterred; he conferred with Thomas Cramner, an academic who told Henry that he should be allowed to divorce and that Henry should also consult the English universities. Henry submitted his case to the theological faculties and most major universities agreed: the marriage was invalid and Henry should be free to marry someone new. ...read more.

Conclusion

Unfortunately for Henry, he also had to endure disappointment because he didn't get the son he wanted - although the surviving daughter from his first marriage, Mary Tudor, was declared by parliament as ineligible for the throne, they had to declare that the one daughter from the second marriage, Elizabeth, was the proper heir. It was not until one of his other four wives, Jane Seymour, produced a son that he finally got a male heir: Edward VI (1547-1553). Because the English crown employed political authority to protect Protestant ideas and oppose Roman Catholicism, England became a haven for Protestants who had to flee political and religious persecution on the continent. Cramner invited those who not only needed protection, but who also were able to help him. In the end. English Protestantism had an important influence on the development of Continental Protestantism when people eventually returned home. Conclusion To end off this essay and conclude I think that, as Henry was a rich and persuasive man he was able to change some of England's rules for his sake. And his only reason possibly to have this reformation and his many wives, was to have bondage between other countries and satisfy himself with a son and happy wife. "aaaaahhhhh, God bless him" :) ...read more.

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