• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month
Page
  1. 1
    1
  2. 2
    2
  3. 3
    3
  4. 4
    4
  5. 5
    5
  6. 6
    6
  7. 7
    7
  8. 8
    8
  9. 9
    9
  10. 10
    10
  11. 11
    11

The United Nations and the Iraq Conflict

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The United Nations and the Iraq Conflict: Recently, a powerful multination tool or a puppet of money and power? Lauren McLeod 250191600 Tom McDowell Politic Science 20E March 5, 2004 The signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 began a new era of promoting international co-operation in attempts to achieve worldwide peace and security with the establishment of the League of Nations, lead by Woodrow Wilson, the president of the United States at the time, and the victorious allied powers of World War I.1 Nonetheless, this league was proven ineffective with the outbreak of the Second World War, but reinforced with the emergence of the United Nations, whose primary task was that of multinational collective security. With the signing of the UN Charter on June 26, 1945, the world undertook a new experiment in organizing states to control war. Worldwide political will to improve the League of Nations had increased after the devastation of two World Wars, the Holocaust and the dawning of the age of nuclear weapons. The international community began a regime of anti-isolationism and committed itself to safeguarding future generations.2 Unlike the League of Nations, United Nations members agreed upon giving the authority to enforce peace through diplomatic, economic, and even military action in response to threats or breaches of international peace.3 Any attack on a member country would be regarded as an attack on the whole. Nonetheless, as time progresses and the United Nations increases in member size, confidence in the organization's ability to protect and restore peace has somewhat declined. In recent years questions have arisen as to the possibility that the individual sovereign states, which form the United Nations, at some point defect from the collective enterprise in pursuit of their own narrow national interests. Moreover, since the UN was formed on the basis of the multinational convergence of numerous political, social and economic interests, does at any point the organization lose validity by beginning to represent one particular power? ...read more.

Middle

In addition, the Middle Eastern Country has an annual GDP of only $58 million and spent a mere $1.3 billion on military expenditures last year.16 As described above, even in an idealistic organization, such as the UN, it is impossible for all member states of the Security Council to be on a level playing field when countries such as the United States, or Great Britain, have such a tight grasp on military and economic power. Money. In order to produce collective security on an international level, a large sum of money is necessary. As stated before, the members of the UN are responsible for fueling the organization through monetary funds. However, this not only affects the aggressors, but also the defenders. The effect of economic hardship as a result of imposing sanctions on a dependent economic partner has the ability to play a role in swaying a country's viewpoint. Switzerland, as an example, refused the sanctions proposed for Mussolini's Italy during the League of Nations, due to the indirect effect it would have had on their country as a result of being interdependent on Italy.17 Economic interdependence has forever influenced the sway of popular votes, and the Iraq war was no different. The question of history, economy and friendship was at stake with Canada's lack of support for the Bush administration's attack on Iraq. The bilateral relationship between the United States and Canada is perhaps the closest and most extensive in the world. It is represented in the staggering volume of trade, the equivalent of over $1 billion a day in goods, services, and investment income. The two countries have set the standard by which many other countries measure their own progress. In addition to their close bilateral ties, Canada and the U.S. also work closely through multilateral fora. Canada, like the United States, being a charter signatory to NATO and the United Nations relies heavily on the interconnectedness of itself and the U.S. ...read more.

Conclusion

Photius Coutsokis. 2003. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.theodora.com/wfb/ 17 Weiss, Thomas G., David P. Forsythe & Roger A. Coate. The United Nations and Chaning World Politics. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994. pg 23 18 "Background Note: Canada." U.S. Department of State. Washington: Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. 2003. March 4, 2004.url: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2089.htm 19 Weiss, Thomas G., David P. Forsythe & Roger A. Coate. The United Nations and Chaning World Politics. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994. pg 22 20 Taft, William H. & Todd F. Buchwald. "International Law and The War in Iraq." The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 639 21 Weiss, Thomas G., David P. Forsythe & Roger A. Coate. The United Nations and Chaning World Politics. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994. pg 24 22 Farer, Tom J. "Law and Force After Iraq: A Transitional Moment." The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 641 23 Gardner, Richard N. "What Future for the UN Charter System of War Prevention?" The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 590 - 598 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 592 24 Abid, pg 594 25 Taft, William H. & Todd F. Buchwald. "International Law and The War in Iraq." The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 630 26 Gardner, Richard N. "What Future for the UN Charter System of War Prevention?" The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 593 27 Urquhart, Brian. The United Nations and International Law. Londo: Cambridge Inuversity Press. 1985. pg 1 28 Nicholas, H.G. The United Nations as a Political Institution. London: Oxford University Press. 1975. pg 76 ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. The emergence of the Superpowers 1945-1962

    day before therefore there was jealousy from Stalin as he wanted to be able to say he had done the same. o How did the USA's nuclear monopoly affect relations? The Americans used the nuclear monopoly and the atomic bomb as a diplomatic tool in the East-West relations.

  2. platoon vs jarhead

    It then cuts to Swoff and the drill instructor. They still use close ups to capture the hate and power of the drill instructor and the pain and anguish of Swoff. They are using diagetic sound, the voices of the characters. The D.I grabs Swoff and pushes him down, using a high angle shot, to show the D.I's position in power.

  1. American Society today is a rich, powerful and highly populated

    The arrival of these immigrants led to the growth of Nativism in America with the call for the " Protection Of American Purity" although some historians argue that this was just a disguise for prejudice and racism. American society including politicians and the public called for restrictions on immigrants and

  2. Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a ...

    A strong FUGITIVE SLAVE LAW was also passed in 1850, giving new powers to slaveowners to reach into northern states to recapture escaped slaves. THE CIVIL WAR ERA As the 1850s began, it seemed for a time that the issue of slavery and other sectional differences between North and South might eventually be reconciled.

  1. History of the United States

    The expansion of slavery was the most fateful event of the pre- Revolutionary years. Virginia had only about 16,000 slaves in 1700; by 1770 it held more than 187,000, or almost half the population of the colony. In low country South Carolina, with its rice and indigo plantations, only 25,000

  2. United Nations: The Wounded Dove

    "The title of the new international body would be UN's, its purpose would be to maintain international security and peace, it would seek to develop friendly relationships amongst all nations, it would try to tackle international economic, social and humanitarian problems.

  1. This graduation paper is about U.S. - Soviet relations in Cold War period. Our ...

    a realist." The final conference of Stalin, Churchill, and Roosevelt at Yalta in February 1945 appeared at the time to carry forward the partnership, although in retrospect it would become clear that the facade of unity was built on a foundation of misperceptions rooted in the different values, priorities, and political ground rules of the two societies.

  2. Britain 1895-1918 June 2004

    However public opinion doesn't dictate policy, and therefore they have no power in whether to say if Britain should go to war with Germany. Britain were worried by Germany's increasing Naval strength as well as the threat posed by Germany to their Indian colony.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work