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The United Nations and the Iraq Conflict

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The United Nations and the Iraq Conflict: Recently, a powerful multination tool or a puppet of money and power? Lauren McLeod 250191600 Tom McDowell Politic Science 20E March 5, 2004 The signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 began a new era of promoting international co-operation in attempts to achieve worldwide peace and security with the establishment of the League of Nations, lead by Woodrow Wilson, the president of the United States at the time, and the victorious allied powers of World War I.1 Nonetheless, this league was proven ineffective with the outbreak of the Second World War, but reinforced with the emergence of the United Nations, whose primary task was that of multinational collective security. With the signing of the UN Charter on June 26, 1945, the world undertook a new experiment in organizing states to control war. Worldwide political will to improve the League of Nations had increased after the devastation of two World Wars, the Holocaust and the dawning of the age of nuclear weapons. The international community began a regime of anti-isolationism and committed itself to safeguarding future generations.2 Unlike the League of Nations, United Nations members agreed upon giving the authority to enforce peace through diplomatic, economic, and even military action in response to threats or breaches of international peace.3 Any attack on a member country would be regarded as an attack on the whole. Nonetheless, as time progresses and the United Nations increases in member size, confidence in the organization's ability to protect and restore peace has somewhat declined. In recent years questions have arisen as to the possibility that the individual sovereign states, which form the United Nations, at some point defect from the collective enterprise in pursuit of their own narrow national interests. Moreover, since the UN was formed on the basis of the multinational convergence of numerous political, social and economic interests, does at any point the organization lose validity by beginning to represent one particular power? ...read more.

Middle

In addition, the Middle Eastern Country has an annual GDP of only $58 million and spent a mere $1.3 billion on military expenditures last year.16 As described above, even in an idealistic organization, such as the UN, it is impossible for all member states of the Security Council to be on a level playing field when countries such as the United States, or Great Britain, have such a tight grasp on military and economic power. Money. In order to produce collective security on an international level, a large sum of money is necessary. As stated before, the members of the UN are responsible for fueling the organization through monetary funds. However, this not only affects the aggressors, but also the defenders. The effect of economic hardship as a result of imposing sanctions on a dependent economic partner has the ability to play a role in swaying a country's viewpoint. Switzerland, as an example, refused the sanctions proposed for Mussolini's Italy during the League of Nations, due to the indirect effect it would have had on their country as a result of being interdependent on Italy.17 Economic interdependence has forever influenced the sway of popular votes, and the Iraq war was no different. The question of history, economy and friendship was at stake with Canada's lack of support for the Bush administration's attack on Iraq. The bilateral relationship between the United States and Canada is perhaps the closest and most extensive in the world. It is represented in the staggering volume of trade, the equivalent of over $1 billion a day in goods, services, and investment income. The two countries have set the standard by which many other countries measure their own progress. In addition to their close bilateral ties, Canada and the U.S. also work closely through multilateral fora. Canada, like the United States, being a charter signatory to NATO and the United Nations relies heavily on the interconnectedness of itself and the U.S. ...read more.

Conclusion

Photius Coutsokis. 2003. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.theodora.com/wfb/ 17 Weiss, Thomas G., David P. Forsythe & Roger A. Coate. The United Nations and Chaning World Politics. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994. pg 23 18 "Background Note: Canada." U.S. Department of State. Washington: Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. 2003. March 4, 2004.url: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2089.htm 19 Weiss, Thomas G., David P. Forsythe & Roger A. Coate. The United Nations and Chaning World Politics. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994. pg 22 20 Taft, William H. & Todd F. Buchwald. "International Law and The War in Iraq." The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 639 21 Weiss, Thomas G., David P. Forsythe & Roger A. Coate. The United Nations and Chaning World Politics. Boulder: Westview Press. 1994. pg 24 22 Farer, Tom J. "Law and Force After Iraq: A Transitional Moment." The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 641 23 Gardner, Richard N. "What Future for the UN Charter System of War Prevention?" The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 590 - 598 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 592 24 Abid, pg 594 25 Taft, William H. & Todd F. Buchwald. "International Law and The War in Iraq." The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 630 26 Gardner, Richard N. "What Future for the UN Charter System of War Prevention?" The American Journal of International Law. 2003. page 628-642 Journal Storage - The Scholarly Journal Archive. 2004. February 29, 2004. url: http://www.jstor.org/ pg 593 27 Urquhart, Brian. The United Nations and International Law. Londo: Cambridge Inuversity Press. 1985. pg 1 28 Nicholas, H.G. The United Nations as a Political Institution. London: Oxford University Press. 1975. pg 76 ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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