• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent did Hitler control anti-semitic policy in the period 1933-9 and to what extent was the policy erratic and improvised

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

History Homework: Essay Question 'To what extent did Hitler control anti-semitic policy in the period 1933-9 and to what extent was the policy erratic and improvised? The Question outlines the main views regarding the Holocaust and Hitler's actual control/power over the anti-semitic events before World War II and the final solution. The Intentionalist view is that 'Hitler did control anti-semitic policy in the period 1933-39', and that he had planned the Holocaust from the beginning; while the Structuralist view was that he was a weak dictator and his policies were 'erratic and improvised'. They both show opposite sides of the argument (with Synthesis's sharing both), with historians from both perspectives ever since the end of World War II, trying to give the correct & absolute answer. Most if not all Intentionalist historians believe Hitler to be the main force of anti-Semitism in the Nazi movement. ...read more.

Middle

Structuralists (such as Mommsen), believe Hitler was a weak dictator, and deny there was ever a set plan for Nazi anti-Semitism. In 1933, the Boycott of Jewish firms and the Law for the Restoration of the professional civil service show Jewish policy as being not well planned during this time. The aim of the discriminating measures against Jews as late as 1938 was to encourage Jews to leave Germany 'by every possible means'. If the Nazi's had a clear plan of the final solution, why did they then bother with immigrating Jews to places such as Madagascar? The fact that Hitler and the Nazis couldn't decide where to actually emigrate the Jews (Israel, Madagascar or Poland), and then came up the final solution, shows evidence of Hitler without any clear plan, and just responding to the then-current circumstance. ...read more.

Conclusion

For much of the period 1933-9 Hitler had shown that he was prepared to be pragmatic, taking into account internal and external pressures, in pursuing his ends. The marked increase in anti-Semitic activity after 1937 may well have reflected Germany's growing power, Hitler's growing contempt for International opinion and the fact that the Conservative old guard within Germany had gone. Hitler's control during this period can be heavily argued from both intentionalist and structuralist viewpoints; and for this precise reason, Synthesism was the sum up the way Nazi's produced increasingly extreme policies. Hitler's ultimate aim in 1938 was forced emigration; it seems very unlikely that he was considering mass murder. Yet, the radical nature of Nazi anti-Semitism was such that completion of one stage would most often lead to the beginning of another, more radical than before. Whilst the thought of genocide almost certainly entered his mind, it is impossible to prove that his main aim in 1938 was to exterminate all Jew's in Europe. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. This essay will examine the rise of anti-Semitism from ancient times to the Holocaust ...

    Food was scarce and the Jews were made to give up their money and possessions to ensure they did not starve. Ruthless ethnic Germans and Poles capitalized on this by selling food at vastly inflated prices in exchange for whatever valuables the Jews would give them (Rees, L., 2005 pp139).

  2. To what extent can Hitler be considered to be "weak"?

    Minister of the Interior who should hold more power over the police than Himmler. This shows that Shirer, Noakes and Pridam all show an approach to Hitler's way of organising his Third Reich. However, do the claims presented by the historians provide a convincing enough argument?

  1. Was Hitler a weak dictator?

    The idea here is that there's actually no way that Hitler wouldn't have had any influence in German politics, to do so would be nonsense. It's factual, however, to state that his power was limited by some means like his lack of control over entities he created, as well the

  2. How far was the holocaust a long term plan of nazi racial policy?

    Therefore, Breitman's emphasis on this line may appear to be slightly unfounded. It is clear by the laws and regulations already imposed by the Nazi government that the Jewish financiers could not finance any form of rebellion due to their exclusion from the German economy, where much of their wealth lay.

  1. "Nazi policy towards the Jews up to 1939 was uncoordinated and erratic."

    The answer was yes. Civil servants welcomed a transition from the excess of the S.A to 'law and order.' Again highlighting the feeling that Nazi policy was becoming uncoordinated and erratic through the excess of the S.A. It is believed NSDAP issued instructions that Jews were to be banned from initially three professions; Legal, Medicine and Teaching.

  2. Causes of show trials + purges of 1930s.

    Children were encouraged to inform on their parents if they suspected them of 'capitalist lendencies'. Malice was responsible for some of the accusations, also the realisation that job opportunities were opened up by the removal of 'unworthy' comrades. 4. There were approximately 1.3 million people sent to Gulags.

  1. The Holocaust

    countries and one it's most famous proponents was Theodor Herzl (1860-1904), who convened the first Zionist Congress in Basle in 1897. Herzl began a series of negotiations with other nations to find a place to found the Jewish homeland. Herzl was adamant that the Jews needed a permanent homeland, saying

  2. To what extent did the increase in the persecution of witches in Europe from ...

    There are some peripheral regions of Europe, with men accounting 90 per cent of the accused in Iceland, 60 per cent in Estonia and nearly 50 per cent in Finland. On the other hand there are regions where 90 per cent or more of known witches were women; these include Hungary, Denmark and England.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work