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To what extent did the First World War contribute to the fall of Czardom in Russia?'

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Introduction

'To what extent did the First World War contribute to the fall of Czardom in Russia?' Since the 1905 Revolution, the Czardom continued to decline. The insincerity of the Czar, setting up of Dumas, the rise of revolutionary group and so on had created an explosive situation in Russia. In 1914, Czar Nicolas II decided to enter the First World War in order to rise the prestige and gain support from people, however, it was the fatal mistake ever made by the royal family which acted as a catalyst for the February Revolution. Though at the beginning, the Russian seemed to support to enter the war, military defeats the government's incompetence soon soured much of the population. Maladministration and ineffective economic policies hurt the country financially, logistically and militarily. Russia entered the war unprepared. There was a grave lack of co-ordination between the Ministry of War and the Front. War Industries Committee was formed to ensure that necessary supplies reached the front. ...read more.

Middle

In 1905, though people were discontented by the poor living standard, they were still willing to support the government on certain matters. However, the consequences of entering First World War clearly revealed the inefficiency for the Czarist government, and people could bare no more, thinking that it might be the right time to overthrow the government. According to Sazonov, 'the government was hanging in the air and had no support either from above or below.' The war made the Czar totally discredited and lost all supports. Nonetheless, there were still some factors that contributed to the fall of Czardom in lesser extent. First of all, the insincerity of the Czar in making reforms had disappointed many Russian. In 1905, though the Czar carried out his promise of an elected duma as he announced in the October Manifesto. However, the Fundamental Law he announced later, which gave him the right to dissolve the Duma, had shown that he was not ready to share his power, he remained autocracy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lastly, Nicolas II was an incapable leader. He was deeply influenced by his wife, Czarina Alexandra. After 1906, the Czarina strongly believed an evil monk, Rasputin, who claimed to use magical powers to cure the serious disease suffered by Nicolas son, Alexis. Therefore, Rasputin became the real hand of the government afterwards, especially during the First World War. However, it could not say that this was a major cause of the fall of Czardom, since Rasputin was murdered by nobles in 1916, the situation was no better onwards. Revolution still broke out after a year later. But Czarina Alexandra and Rasputin undoubtedly decreased the regime's prestige and credibility. To conclude, though there were lots of underlying causes that contributed to the fall of Czardom, they only created an explosive time bomb for a revolution. It was the WWI act as a trigger, brought about the people and overthrown the Czardom in 1917 February Revolution. Therefore, WWI is the major cause to the fall of Czardom. Reference: Aspects of European History 1789-1980 --- Stephen J. Lee Mastering Modern European History --- Stuart T. Miller ?? ?? ?? ?? History essay Alexandra Mok 6A 18 - 1 - ...read more.

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