• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent did the First World War contribute to the fall of Czardom in Russia?'

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

'To what extent did the First World War contribute to the fall of Czardom in Russia?' Since the 1905 Revolution, the Czardom continued to decline. The insincerity of the Czar, setting up of Dumas, the rise of revolutionary group and so on had created an explosive situation in Russia. In 1914, Czar Nicolas II decided to enter the First World War in order to rise the prestige and gain support from people, however, it was the fatal mistake ever made by the royal family which acted as a catalyst for the February Revolution. Though at the beginning, the Russian seemed to support to enter the war, military defeats the government's incompetence soon soured much of the population. Maladministration and ineffective economic policies hurt the country financially, logistically and militarily. Russia entered the war unprepared. There was a grave lack of co-ordination between the Ministry of War and the Front. War Industries Committee was formed to ensure that necessary supplies reached the front. ...read more.

Middle

In 1905, though people were discontented by the poor living standard, they were still willing to support the government on certain matters. However, the consequences of entering First World War clearly revealed the inefficiency for the Czarist government, and people could bare no more, thinking that it might be the right time to overthrow the government. According to Sazonov, 'the government was hanging in the air and had no support either from above or below.' The war made the Czar totally discredited and lost all supports. Nonetheless, there were still some factors that contributed to the fall of Czardom in lesser extent. First of all, the insincerity of the Czar in making reforms had disappointed many Russian. In 1905, though the Czar carried out his promise of an elected duma as he announced in the October Manifesto. However, the Fundamental Law he announced later, which gave him the right to dissolve the Duma, had shown that he was not ready to share his power, he remained autocracy. ...read more.

Conclusion

Lastly, Nicolas II was an incapable leader. He was deeply influenced by his wife, Czarina Alexandra. After 1906, the Czarina strongly believed an evil monk, Rasputin, who claimed to use magical powers to cure the serious disease suffered by Nicolas son, Alexis. Therefore, Rasputin became the real hand of the government afterwards, especially during the First World War. However, it could not say that this was a major cause of the fall of Czardom, since Rasputin was murdered by nobles in 1916, the situation was no better onwards. Revolution still broke out after a year later. But Czarina Alexandra and Rasputin undoubtedly decreased the regime's prestige and credibility. To conclude, though there were lots of underlying causes that contributed to the fall of Czardom, they only created an explosive time bomb for a revolution. It was the WWI act as a trigger, brought about the people and overthrown the Czardom in 1917 February Revolution. Therefore, WWI is the major cause to the fall of Czardom. Reference: Aspects of European History 1789-1980 --- Stephen J. Lee Mastering Modern European History --- Stuart T. Miller ?? ?? ?? ?? History essay Alexandra Mok 6A 18 - 1 - ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Causes of WWI.

    It covers the horror of this war through the eyes of a young German solider, Paul Baumer. This book is not like other books and stories that glorify wars. It tells the horrors of war in detail. The story recalls the bloody details of bombing, gunfire, gas, hand-to-hand combat, barbed wire, trench warfare and etc.

  2. "To What Extent Were Gorbachev's Policies the Catalyst to the Fall of the USSR?"

    from Pravda, a main soviet newspaper and primary source; Historical factfiles from Encarta encyclopaedia on-line, and certain reports from Jack F. Matlock, Jr., former U.S. Ambassador to the USSR, this also being a primary source; the most important, perhaps, may be considered to be Graeme Gill's "The collapse of a single party system: the disintegration of the CPSU3".

  1. American History.

    - They were only saved when the Pokanokets [led by Massasoit], a local Indian tribe that had lost many people in an epidemic and were threatened by their neighbors, decided they would be useful allies. *The Puritans* - As the Pilgrims struggled to survive and create their small town community,

  2. Free essay

    To what extent are Walter Scott(TM)s novels a product of the Scottish Enlightenment? Discuss ...

    - Donald Ben Lean (a cattle-rustler), Vich Ian Vohr (the local chieftain), and his beautiful daughter, Flora, who captivates the na�ve Edward with tales of hunting, romance and music in France. Volume II portrays a sharp change in Edward's historical perception: a change characterized by his confrontation with the harshness of reality.

  1. The Fall of Classical Greece

    When people became affected they often resorted to "unprecedented lawlessness"8. Many lost their entire family and died alone in the streets. The exact numbers are debatable but Attica likely lost one-quarter to one-third of its population9. The plague, in only the second year of a twenty-seven-year long war, is what ultimately drove the Athenian defeat.

  2. China After World War II

    Chu Hsieh-fan, Chinese representative to the Paris International Labor Conference and notorious throughout China as a "bosses' man" and strikebreaker, has organized a Labor Federation with a distinct anti-Kuomintang coloration, evidently with the aim of dominating the radicalized labor movement.

  1. Why was there a revolution in Feburary 1917?

    Recognised by the Petrograd Soviet and the army and navy, the Provisional Government enjoyed widespread popularity at first. It disbanded the Tsarist police, repealed all limitations on freedom of opinion, press, and association, and put an end to all laws discriminating against national or religious groups.

  2. How Stable Was the Tsarist Autocracy in 1914?

    While liberals dismiss these figures altogether, Revisionists appear more eager to examine the evidence before concluding. It is hard for a professional historian to dismiss 20, 000 social disturbances between 1907- 14 whilst there were exceptional harvests and a strong recovery of the grain price.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work