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To what extent did the needs of British manufacturers drive the expansion of the slave trade in the years c1760c1800?

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Introduction

During the years of C1760 ? C1800 Britain were heavily involved in manufacturing, this was mainly due to the transatlantic slave trade. This asks the question to what extent did the needs of the British manufacturers drive the expansion of the slave trade in the years C1760-C1800. This question is very important especially in the history of the British Empire because it was one of the factors which made Britain dominant and imperial. The three main factors which will be analysed in this essay are that the slave trade provided capital for investment. The slave trade was also a market for manufactured goods and the Slave trade was also crucial to the Atlantic trading system. This essay will evaluate why the needs of British manufacturers were responsible for driving the expansion of the Slave trade in the years C1760-C1800. The ?slave trade? refers to the transatlantic trade triangle. This is where European ships would set sail to Africa. The ships would be filled with cargo such as Copper, cloth, glassware, ammunition, guns, manilas, brass and iron. This type of cargo was usually all manufactured goods. ...read more.

Middle

This was a massive market. A prime example of how the market was crucial is “Manillas”[4]. This good was manufactured in Britain and then taken to Africa to trade. This good became extremely popular in Africa and was used as currency. This gave manufacturers an incentive to produce more of the good in order to obtain larger profits. This means that manufacturers became extremely interested in the slave trade as it was a major source of income. The more manufacturers produced meant the more slaves being bought therefore meaning more slaves in plantations. This shows that manufacturers did drive the expansion of the slave trade in the given period. Britain also profited from goods sold to colonies. During 1770 96.3% of British exports of nails and 70.5% exports of wrought iron went to colonial and African markets[5]. Textile exports were also large and often accounted for around a half of British exports. In 1770 total investments in the domestic British economy stood at £4 million[6] (£500 million in today's money). During the French Wars in 1793-1802 British exporters often found that they had to rely on colonial and American markets. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example The South Sea Company was involved in the trading of slaves and the company took advantage of the Assiento[10] this meant that the company was able to bring a total of 144,000 slaves to the Spanish colonies for a period of 30 years. This gave the Company a massive financial gain; this gain gave the government and other trading companies the incentive to generate huge profits. This factor was extremely important to the expansion of the slave trade because it was the largest contributor to the trade triangle. In conclusion, there are many alternative factors that drove the expansion of the slave trade in the years C1760-C1800. These factors did contribute to the slave trade, however, British manufacturers did also contribute and in retrospect they had more of significance in expanding the slave trade; the slave trade provided capital for investment, it also created a market for manufactured goods and the Slave trade was also crucial to the Atlantic trading system. This essay has stated figures and reasons why these points are significant and that is why the final conclusion of this essay is that the needs of British manufacturers drove the expansion of the slave trade in the years C1760-C1800 to a major extent. ...read more.

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