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To what extent did the post-war peacemaking and peacekeeping efforts affect international relations leading up to the Second World War?

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Introduction

` ________________ Section A- Plan of Investigation This historical investigation will cover the working question ?to what extent did the post-war peacemaking and peacekeeping efforts affect international relations leading up to the Second World War??, looking into France?s initial use of pacifism after World War One through the establishment of the Treaty of Versailles (1919); the establishment and failure of the League of Nations (1920-1939); and the world-wide shockwave created by the Great Depression (1933) to answer this question. (72 words) Section B- Summary of Evidence In the short amount of time between World Wars, there were a small number of peacekeeping efforts made. These include France and the Treaty of Versailles; a few feeble measures taken by the League of Nations, and the unplanned Great Depression. However, none of these peacekeeping efforts seem to have kept much peace. The Treaty humiliated Germany, the depression made them ?weak? and the League of Nations really did nothing at all to stop Hitler and the Nazi party from taking over. All three of these events actually did more harm than good in attributing to the Second World War. (100 words) Section C- Evaluation of Sources The two main sources used in this investigation include; "Pacifism." Political Theories for Students. Ed. Matthew Miskelly and Jaime Noce. Vol. 1. and "League of Nations." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Vol. 3. (45 words) The articles in the first source define and describe pacifism. ...read more.

Middle

Economies all over the world were declining, stocks falling, unemployment rising. Economies were falling to only fractions of what they had been years prior. In Germany unemployment began to take a shapt upturn and by 1932 six million workers were unemployed, approximately twenty five percent of the work force. [5]This economic nosedive allowed Hitler and his nationalist party to ?move into political center-stage?; Hitler used propaganda ruthlessly to uphold his ideas and the image that he would be the ?German messiah who would lead Germany into a future of social harmony, economic well-being, and national rebirth.? [6] Many of the political leaders of the time were under pressure to take forceful measures to put an end the depression, so more than 60 nations met at the World Economic Conference in London in 1933, when that failed it seemed that the nations of the world were to figure out a solution for themselves. ?The global economic crisis and the world's poorly organized response to it in part led to the outbreak of World War II in Europe in 1939.?[7] There were organizations being established around this era in different countries to try to gain control of the conflicts and radically changing ideals; of these organizations, the League of Nations was one of the most important pertaining to World War Two. (295 words) The League of Nations, established in January 1920 by the United States Senate, was initially established to prevent a major outbreak of war. The objective of the League was also to ?contain and resolve, by peaceful means as far as possible, any disputes that did break ...read more.

Conclusion

World War I Reference Library. Ed. Sara Pendergast, Christine Slovey, and Tom Pendergast. Vol. 1: Almanac. Detroit: UXL, 2002. 171-186. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 20 Oct. 2012. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3411700020&v=2.1&u=calg62905&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w [4] "Global Impact 1929-1939." Historic Events for Students: The Great Depression. Ed. Richard C. Hanes and Sharon M. Hanes. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 2002. 50-69. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 31 Oct. 2012. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3424800042&v=2.1&u=calg62905&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w [5] Board, serious policy mistakes of the Federal Reserve. "About the Great Depression." Welcome to English « Department of English, College of LAS, University of Illinois. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Oct. 2012. <http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/about.htm> [6] "Hitler, Adolf (1889–1945)." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2006. 1324-1331. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 11 Dec. 2012. [7] "Global Impact 1929-1939." Historic Events for Students: The Great Depression. Ed. Richard C. Hanes and Sharon M. Hanes. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 2002. 50-69. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. 31 Oct. 2012. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX3424800042&v=2.1&u=calg62905&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w [8] "League of Nations." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2006. 1628-1631. Gale World History In Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2012. [9] "League of Nations." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2006. 1628-1631. Gale World History In Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2012. [10] "League of Nations." Europe Since 1914: Encyclopedia of the Age of War and Reconstruction. Ed. John Merriman and Jay Winter. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2006. 1628-1631. Gale World History In Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2012. ...read more.

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