• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent did the Vietnam War impact upon US domestic politics and society during and after the conflict?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To what extent did the Vietnam War impact upon US domestic politics and society during and after the conflict? SECOND DRAFT The Vietnam war was fought during the years 1960 to 1975. It began as a determined attempt by Communist guerrillas, the so called Vietcong, in the South, backed by Communist North Vietnam, to overthrow the government of South Vietnam. The struggle widened into a war between South Vietnam and North Vietnam and ultimately into a limited international conflict. The United States and some 40 other countries supported South Vietnam by supplying troops and munitions, and the USSR and the People's Republic of China furnished munitions to North Vietnam and the Vietcong. On both sides, however, the burden of the war fell mainly on the civilians. America's foreign policy followed what was called the 'domino theory'. This was the idea that the countries of South East Asia were closely linked together. If one fell to communism, then others would also fall, like a row of dominoes. China became communist in 1949. North Korea and North Vietnam also had communist governments. If the South Vietnamese 'domino' followed, who would be next? Malaya? Burma? In 1961, John Kennedy became President of the USA (1961-63) ...read more.

Middle

That is why once the US had become involved they did not pull out easily as the consequences would have been very severe. Then on 22 November 1963 a tragic event took place. President John F. Kennedy was shot and killed as he was riding in an open limousine through the streets of Dallas. His Deputy Lyndon B Johnson was sworn in as President, the same day. LBJ further increased the number of advisors and equipment being sent to Vietnam, he wanted to declare war and destroy North Vietnam and Communism as soon as possible, even if he had to sacrifice his plans for a 'Great Society.' 'Losing the Great Society was a terrible thought, but not so terrible as the thought of being responsible for America's losing a war to the Communists. Nothing could possibly be worse than that.' 3 This source clearly shows the sense of urgency LBJ had. At no point was he willing to back away from Vietnam, quite the contrary, he saw the US as the worlds policeman and an ambassador to Capitalism, that had a duty to wipe out Communism. This war was different from all other wars that had been fought, it was uncensored and nearly everything that took place in Vietnam was shown on US television, this had a profound effect on the American public. ...read more.

Conclusion

Once an American male turned 18 years of age, he was under federal order to register with Selective Service, which provided him with an identification card. Applying for the card made the local draft boards, composed of groups of civilians, aware of available young men. This led to further chaos for the government as many people dodged conscription by fleeing to neighbouring Canada or by simply burning their draft cards. Some burnt their cards in public, others just refused to report for training. Both were criminal offences and by the end of 1969 there were 34,000 draft-dodgers wanted by the police. 'My name is John Lacey. I was born in 1945 and brought up in New York. I left America in 1967 just after leaving college. I did this to avoid being drafted. I went to Canada and then to Sweden where I lived till there was an amnesty for the draft-dodgers which let me return to the USA' 6 1 Vietnam: Conflict and Change in Indochina by Alan Pollock 2 Vietnam 1939-75 by Neil Demarco. 3 President Lyndon B. Johnson. 4 Roger LaPorte, member of the Catholic Worker movement, quoted in wire-service story after setting himself on fire in front of the United Nations building, 1965. 5 Martin Luther King speaks out against the war. Vietnam 1939-75 by Neil Demarco. 6 J. Cannon et al., The Contemporary World, Conflict or Co-operation?, p.26 Nassar Ahmad U6JJ ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. What can you learn from Source A about the reasons for US involvement in ...

    By giving the results as percentages, the figures are being manipulated; it could be 64% of one hundred or 64% of ten thousand.

  2. America In Vietnam, 1953-73

    Moderate anti rights groups condemned the exclusion of blacks; but in 1966 the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), one of the major civil rights organisations in the south, declared its support for "the men in this country who are unwilling to respond to military draft which would compel them to

  1. British Domestic life During WW2.

    This was because many of the poor people that made up the majority of city folk were too poor to feed themselves and their families properly. This led to the nation as a whole being generally healthier.

  2. This graduation paper is about U.S. - Soviet relations in Cold War period. Our ...

    If some form of massive support to reconstruct Europe's economy were not developed, economic decay there would spread, unemployment in America would increase, and political instability could well lead to communist takeovers of hitherto "friendly" counties. 3.2 Cold War Issues.

  1. How was opposition to the Vietnam War portrayed in Contemporary Literature, Film and popular ...

    OS servicemen, and the source is obviously supported by eyewitness accounts of the events. However the source s reliability may be brought into question on a number of accounts. This source details only a minority's interrogation techniques, leaving us to " how many of the OS servicemen acted in this way".

  2. Korean propaganda during the Second World War and the Korean War had a different ...

    On the other -6- hand, Americans were spreading propaganda in the South. The main argument of Southern propaganda was: Communism only widens the gap between the middle/lower class and the higher class. The words and actions of communism don't follow through.

  1. Introduction - US policy to Southeast Asia in general

    Indochina became a difficult contradiction in American foreign policy. Washington knew how important the colony was to France, and foresaw the danger of communism gaining a foothold in the region. If France were to abandon Indochina, communism could spread throughout Southeast Asia. The alternative was to endorse and support French colonialism, with the French economy and military forces necessarily

  2. Red Scare and USA domestic policy in the 50´s.

    The commander of the UN troops was General MacArthur. This war was really an American affair. Nine out of ten soldiers in Korea were American so too was their commander.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work