• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent do these sources differ in their view of the American reaction to British policy in the Suez Crisis?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

(a) (b) To what extent do these sources differ in their view of the American reaction to British policy in the Suez Crisis? There are some quite clear differences between sources A and B on the American reaction to British policy during the Suez Crisis. For example, source A shows that the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Macmillan, believed that United States President Eisenhower "...seemed to understand" Britain's difficulties. Also, he reported that Eisenhower "...accepted..." that winning this dispute was crucial to the survival of Britain's economy from the trade angle as well as the use of resources. In contrast to this, source B describes President Eisenhower's "...astonishment, then anger..." at Britain's offensive on Egypt. This reaction was perhaps more a result of Britain's "...glaring deception of their closest ally," in that they went ahead without America's say so, thereby putting their nose out of joint, rather than their rapidly resorting to "...gunboat diplomacy..." Indeed, America's appreciation for the use of force is reflected at the end of source A where Eisenhower's Secretary Dulles is reported as having said that the "...threat of force was vital..."as this would perhaps intimidate Nasser into backing down. ...read more.

Middle

This implies that Britain was such a great power that their threat of force would actually worry Nasser. At the time Britain was not as highly regarded in the world as they thought. Therefore, source A does show that Britain and perhaps America were under some illusions as to Britain's status in the world. From source B we can gather that America did not hold Britain in as high esteem as was believed. Indeed, their disbelief and then 'anger' at Britain's taking the initiative to act gives the impression that they wanted someone to cling to their coat tails and pat them on the back rather than an equal ally. President Eisenhower's explosive outburst on the telephone to Downing Street after the Israeli and British attacks on Egypt can certainly have left no doubt in Prime Minister Eden's mind as to America's opinion of his actions. The only explanation Eisenhower could imagine would cause Eden's "...glaring deception of their closest ally..." was "...that you have gone mad!" If Britain saw the reaction of the United States for what it was, then it would definitely have 'destroyed' their valued deceptive ideals of National unity and their pride in being shoulder to shoulder with one of the world's superpowers. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example, a Gallup poll in the winter of 1955 showed that 70% of those who voted were for Eden, but a few months later in the spring of 1956, this had dropped to 40%. This shows that the disillusionment was gradual and not immediate. This is backed up by the results of the by-elections during Eden's premiership, all but one showing a swing against the Conservative Party. Eden was expected to stand no nonsense from Nasser, who had been presented as a second Hitler. Perhaps his go down fighting stance was what brought the old unity and pride back from the war, at least in part. This is demonstrated in the opinion polls in which Eden received 48.5% of the popular vote on 30th October 1956, which rose to 60.5% on 21st November. In conclusion, there were cherished illusions destroyed by the Suez Crisis of 1956. The statement in question is therefore valid. However, it is reasonable to assume that not everyone had the proverbial wool pulled over their eyes and so the statement is not absolutely valid, but valid to a lesser extent. This disillusionment was seen as regrettable, but its possible that it helped prepare the British people for the decolonisation that inevitably happened during the 1960's. It was probably therefore the most positive product of the Suez Crisis. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. To what extent can the Suez Canal crisis of 1956 been said to have ...

    Under the Anglo-Egyptian treaty of 1936, which made Egypt virtually independent, Britain reserved rights for the protection of the canal, but after World War II, Egypt pressed for evacuation of British troops from the area. Egypt in 1951 repudiated the 1936 treaty, and anti-British rioting and clashes on the border of the zone erupted.

  2. Europe and the Suez Crisis 1956 - To what extent was the military action ...

    Despite of this plan, the issue of using military force in Egypt remained a burning issue among the British Conservatives. According to Carlton, the British Cabinet, appeared divided on the matter of "straight bash" on the Canal issue by early September.4 The public opinion was strongly pro-military actions and called

  1. To what extent can Britain's policy towards Germanybefore Munichbe defended?

    and Austria, which he knew would be largely unworkable or to follow his own instincts i.e. appeasement remained a major predicament. Chamberlain didn't see why Sudeten Germans should not have the right to return to Germany, as with Austria and Danzig.

  2. Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a ...

    Domestic Politics: 1815-46 In a nationalist frame of mind at the end of the War of 1812, Congress chartered the Second Bank of the United States in 1816, erected the first protective tariff (see TARIFF ACTS), and supported internal improvements (roads and bridges)

  1. History of the United States

    Progressivism at Home Meanwhile, the Progressive Era was also underway in domestic politics. City governments were transformed, becoming relatively honest and efficient; social workers labored to improve slum housing, health, and education; and in many states reform movements democratized, purified, and humanized government.

  2. To what extent was independence a gift from Britain.

    Indian Government assimilated in return for being able to tax Lancashire cottons. This ability to obtain concessions from the British Government due to its financial constraints illustrates both Britain's decline as a world power and thus India's rising parity. Furthermore, the fact that after World War Two India passed from

  1. Extent of American Unity and Identity.

    When General William Pitt finally showed up to help, he began forcing men to enlist and taking colonists' weapons and tools with no compensation. The Americans were not used to the British officers. Years of living without classes and ranks had given the Americans a unique attitude (Doc.

  2. To what extent did the reasons for and the nature of American and Soviet ...

    The USSR policy in the Middle-East was characterized in the beginning by aggression and Soviet expansionism as openly stated by Stalin, the supplied Egypt in its fight against Israel with arms and military equipment, as well as sending soviet experts to Egypt to offer their expertise.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work