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To what extent was 1549 a turning point? 1549 was undoubtedly a massive year for Tudor rebellion with almost every county in England taking part in some kind of uprising.

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Introduction

To what extent was 1549 a turning point? 1549 was undoubtedly a massive year for Tudor rebellion - with almost every county in England taking part in some kind of uprising. It is not therefore surprising that 1549, in the case of English rebellion, can be seen as a turning point, but this does not take the Irish rebellions into consideration. In this respect, 1549 is by no means a turning point, as there is no significant Irish rebellion between the years of 1534 and 1558. The first aspect which would give an indication as to whether 1549 was a turning point or not is the frequency of size of the rebellion; the number of rebels which took part. In the period leading up to 1549 ie. 1486 onwards, of the nine rebellions which took place (including 1549), seven of these had a support size of 6000 or more rebels, which indicates ...read more.

Middle

Henceforth, with regard to Irish rebellions, 1549 was not a turning point. It is not just the number of rebels that count of course though, it is the quality of the rebels and the quality of leadership - in other words, did the rebels/leaders have any power in the Tudor society, and did this lessen after 1549? In short, the answer is yes, as it does seem that the nobles after 1549 which took part in the rebellions were of not much consequence - at least not as important as the nobles before this date. Furthermore, the gentry after 1549 realized that they did not want to rebel anymore, as they did not see positives outweighing the probable negatives - death. For example, both Simnel and Warbeck had great noble support; Lord Fitzwater, Sir Simon Mountfort, and Sir Thomas Thwaites, made little secret of their inclination towards him; Sir William Stanley, King Henry's ...read more.

Conclusion

However, there is a marked difference in the power that these nobles possessed and the significance of the nobles before 1549. The Earls of Westmoreland and Northumberland, leaders of the rebellion of the Northern Earls actually rebelled due to the fact that they had lost so much power under Elizabeth, and the nobles that led the Essex rebellion were also disgruntled because of Cecil's power and influence and ultimately failed to get popular support because of the fear of reprisal, hence they didn't have the authority that the nobles that took part in the rebellion before 1549 did. Therefore, 1549 can once again be seen as a turning point in terms of English rebellion, whereas in Ireland, 1549 again had no major impact on its support, with the Irish clan leaders leading the rebellions before and after 1549, and so this year had no major impact on the rebellions within Ireland. ...read more.

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