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To what extent was effective Royal Government re-established in England in the years 1471-83?

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Introduction

To what extent was effective Royal Government re-established in England in the years 1471-83? Edward IV completely ruined his chances in his first reign by not stabilizing himself on the throne as he was too occupied dealing with rebellions. He proved himself able when he re-gained the throne in 1471 because he showed that he was willing to compromise to his people and his excellent memory made it possible for him to sympathize with his people. Edward gave out instructions personally by word of mouth which was potentially what made his Finance Policy so successful. Personal involvement made it possible for him to be given more benevolences for example in 1473, Edward kissed an old lady's hand and she gave him a sum of money which she then doubled, the fact that he was using every resource effectively yet not to excess suggests that he was an efficient ruler. In 1471, Edward transferred �21,000 from the Exchequer to the Chamber Finance, this new system that he created stopped corruption and enabled him to have control over his finance as he would personally check and sign accounts as opposed to his first reign, implying that he was effective in trying to restore an efficient government. ...read more.

Middle

This successfully decreased chances of rebellion and furthers the idea that he re-established a more balanced, effective government. Edward managed to tame his new creations for example, Hastings and Herbert; as they were reliant on him for survival avoiding over-mighty nobles, this also made it difficult to be overthrow him and therefore allowed him to rule successfully. The execution and attainder of George Duke of Clarence in 1478 implies that Edward maintained rebellion to the bare minimum furthermore; being the only rebellion during his second reign in 1471-83 supports the claim that he successfully re-established royal government. Edward continues his Burgundy alliance which helps him to regain the throne in 1471; this implies he had a balanced sense of judgment and trustworthy allies. His foreign policy can be regarded as successful because achieved some of his goals. Although it can be argued that he completely lost his chances through indolence, events like the invasion on France in 1475 proves differently because even though there was no war, he the signed treaty of Picquigny and compromised his daughter to marry the French heir. Moreover, he received a pension from the French king and an instant payment of 50,000 crowns, showing that he was able to negotiate successfully. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 1475 at Hampshire; Edward witnessed a case where twenty people were charged for breaking the law, ten of them were tried and eight were found guilty, suggesting that he maintained law and order. Despite the continuation of bastard feudalism, he had many other successes in his justice policy and those who served him remained loyal until his death, supporting the idea that he re-established an effective government. Edward seemed to have become a more precautious King as most of his new statutes and actions took place within a brief period after he regained his throne in 1471. He was determined to put right what was wrong as quickly as possible, suggesting that he was effective in re-establishing the royal government in England. Even though his justice policy wasn't brilliant, Edward made sure the laws were enforced. Despite having minimal invasion plans that were never acted upon for example France in 1480, his foreign policy was also successful because of many triumphs such as the invasion in Scotland. He dealt rebellions and protestors so effectively that there were hardly any, suggesting that he was an efficient ruler. More importantly, his financial policy is significant and is certainly one of the main reasons why Edward was more successful in his second reign. All these accomplishments support the view that Edward IV re-established an effective government and was efficient in doing so, notably showing the importance of his reign. ...read more.

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