• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent was Richard III responsible for his insecurity as King?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To what extent was Richard III responsible for his insecurity as King? Richard III is one of the most controversial monarchs who history has seen fit to label a monstrous villain. Most of this is due to Shakespeare?s play ?Richard III? who portrayed him as evil personified as well as the Tudor propaganda, which has influenced our perception of him. There have been many historians, who are dedicated to clearing his name, yet in the reverse many propose to expose his vicious crimes. However, of how much of his insecurity was his own fault. Was Richard III completely to blame for the outcome of controversy to his name! Richard is probably best well known for the rumours about his involvement in the killing of the two princes ? his nephews. He declared the marriage of Edward IV and Elizabeth Woodville illegitimate and said that their two sons (heir to the throne) were ?bastards? before taking the throne for himself and murdering the boys. Much like 21st century the killing of children is greatly condemned and by doing this made him unpopular as a king. He made a serious error carrying out this plot and had little hope of holding onto the crown after his actions. ...read more.

Middle

It showed those around him that didn?t have the backing or the power to be able to stop the over-mighty subject. Again, this was only the fault of Richard himself. He gave Buckingham the power and literally set him up to be able to enforce a rebellion. Buckingham knew that Richard was in debt to him and could therefore push to get what he wanted knowing the king would not try to stop him. If Richard had been more forceful in dealing with this powerful noble it may have restored him some success. On the other hand, Richard had many strengths that aided him in reducing the amount of insecurity he had as king. During his reign Richard proved to be a capable and energetic king. In politics and government he was determined to stamp his authority on the kingdom by promising to outlaw corruption, restore peace and reform the legal system. By doing this he showed that he was putting in place actions which would make his country a better place ? this would have definitely got him a lot of credit. He also participated in government and moved around the kingdom to show himself to his subjects. ...read more.

Conclusion

Richard also took time to build amazingly structured halls, chapels and buildings. The way in which he embraced religion sent of a good message to his people ? it allowed them to look at him in a different light. By being accepted by the church and its followers gave Richard a guarded, strong support system as religion was a very powerful source! Overall, Richard did have a great input on his insecurities yet he did do many successful things, which helped to counteract them. Taking drastic measures, like killing the heir to the throne/his own nephews, meant that he lost A LOT of backing. Not only this but Henry Tudor and his foreign relations also aided him into feeling more insecure. Richard?s main problem was that he did not have a good following and this gave him great doubt and weakness throughout his reign. On the positive side he was an active outgoing king, with little opposition, yet he greatly lacked following (through his own fault) which diminished all value of his good deeds. If he had have had assistance from his people, doubled with his success, he could have been a great king! ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. What kind of king does Shakespeare create in Act 3 Scenes 1 and 2? ...

    Henry as wanting his men to know that if they die fighting it was for a just cause. Here Henry illustrates assurance and understanding in his cause for war, his overall audacity and conviction the play is what makes him such a good king.

  2. How far & to what extent was Louis responsible for the turn of events ...

    Over the months between August 1787 and August 1788, meetings, centred around the regional parlements occurred. The clergy (1st estate) supported these riots by the 2nd estate, against Louis' royal authority, by 'gifting' the king a quarter of the dans gratuit it usually paid.

  1. Discuss Shakespeare's presentation of women in Richard III. Are they convincing characters?

    He also implies that her family are all out of control, by saying 'Anthony Woodville, her brother there.' Richard rightly views her as an enemy, since she opposes his rise to power and Elizabeth seems well aware of his hostility towards her.

  2. This essay examines the actions of Charles VII in relation to events pertaining to ...

    New York: J.B. Lippincott, 1990. This book proved to be an excellent source on the study of Joan of Arc as it provided detailed information in addition to valuable insights into the human relationships and emotions involved with the main figures of the time.

  1. How important was foreign support for Henry Tudor in explaining Richard III

    This was a very important factor in letting Henry Tudor win as his army was very small and if Richard III had a big army then Henry Tudor would have been defeated and no doubt killed. Henry Tudors mother Margaret Beaufort was an important factor in Henry Tudor's victory at

  2. Discuss the relationship between Richard II and its source 'How kyng Richarde the seconde....'

    Richard is 'shown' as well as 'told' which, particularly during the first two Acts, results in conflicting impressions of him. In Act 1 Scene 1, he appears as the regal, 'impartial' (1.1.115) king, 'not born to sue, but to command' (1.1.196).

  1. How effective was Richard III as King of England?

    He was not like because of his greatest limitation- his usurpation, which shadows all of his actions. He did not have a good relationship with his Nobles and his death is testimony to failure of his relationship with ay least one of his magnates.

  2. Why was Henry Tudor able to overthrow Richard III?

    Richard's character, although we cannot be sure due to nearly all sources being affected by Tudor myth, was a deceitful one and reactions to him, shown by the immediate acceptance of Henry Tudor, can be seen as being negative. The nature of his usurpation shows him to be a strong

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work