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To what extent was the army mainly responsible for the changes in politics and government in the period 1648 1685?

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Introduction

To what extent was the army mainly responsible for the changes in politics and government in the period 1648 ? 1685? The problems facing the governments in the period 1648 ? 1685 were manifold. This meant that none of the governments during the interregnum could survive and caused difficulties for the Restoration government too. For all the governments during 1648 ? 1660, radicalism was a major factor that they faced. The Rump failed as they were not doing enough to satisfy radicals. Each of the regimes was fatally flawed due to the difficulty of combining the radical reform with the return to stability. ...read more.

Middle

The opposition from the army led to the resignation of Richard Cromwell so subsequently the failure of the Protectorate in 1659. However, the Restoration in 1660 led to the end of radicalism as a problem for the government. The restoration settlement allowed religious toleration; however this later changed with the Cavalier Parliament and the Clarendon code 1661-65 which was an anti-puritan campaign. Leading to opposition from puritans and created great tension between Parliament and Charles II who wanted toleration. This was further enhanced with the Declaration of Indulgence 1672, which was forcibly counteracted with Test Act passed by an angry Parliament in 1673. ...read more.

Conclusion

To conclude, because of the very different natures of the government during 1648 ? 85, they faced very different problems. During 1648-60 the politicised army was mainly responsible for the problems faced by governments, due to the huge divisions between radicals who wanted drastic reforms and conservatives who wanted return to normality; this ultimately led to the failure of them all. However, after 1660 radicalism was not a problem for the government, for the government of the restoration it can be argued that finance was the main responsibility as it impaired Charles? religious policies and allowed Parliament to gain power over the new king. ...read more.

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