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To what extent was the Great Terror Stalins main form of social control during the 1930s?

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Introduction

Transfer-Encoding: chunked To what extent was the Great Terror Stalin?s main form of social control during the 1930s? The 1930s was a period which saw the extension of a totalitarian regime within Russia. The Great Terror, the Cult of Personality and social policy were all forms of social control in the 1930s, influencing the behaviour and attitudes of the Russian people. While the Great Terror eliminated served as propaganda for Stalin?s reliability and spurred similar behaviour, it was not the main form of social control during the 1930s. The Great Terror was undoubtedly an important form of social control, serving as a tool of propaganda, while inspiring the loyalty of Russian?s from below. The Trials of the Sixteen, Seventeen and Twenty-One (1936, 1937 and 1938) publicly denounced Stalin?s rivals, accusing them of plotting against Stalin and the Party. In this sense, they proved to the Russian people that he alone could be trusted with the future of Russia. Said trust was an important form of social control as it inspired the loyalty of ordinary Russians. ...read more.

Middle

This idea became was cemented as Marxism-Leninism-Stalinism became the official ideology of the communist party. The Cult of Stalin and Lenin further served as a form of social control as it provided a popular focus for communism. Stalin?s birthday became a national holiday and citizens could participate in the Cults by purchasing painting of the two men or collections of their speeches. At a time when consumer goods were scarce and diet generally poor, engaging in these cults served as a distraction from the failings of the regime. Ultimately, while the Great Terror inspired loyalty and provided a method for ordinary Russians to express their frustrations, the Cult of Personality did more to elevate Stalin in the eyes of the people. Being seen as carrying on the work of Lenin, a secular saint in the eyes of many, Stalin gained the loyalty and enthusiasm of Russians which underpinned social control. To a lesser extent, social policy formed a part of Stalin?s social control in the 1930s. ...read more.

Conclusion

In this sense, Stalin?s social policy did play a considerable role in his extension of social control in the 1930s. While his social policy did not spur as much personal loyalty as the Cult of Personality did, the government?s ideal values were widely promoted and asserted throughout society. In conclusion, The Great Terror was not the main, but an important form of Stalin?s social control in the 1930s. It served as a public display that Stalin was a powerful and trustworthy leader who could eliminate potential threats to the communist regime and in turn inspired ordinary Russian?s to follow Stalin?s example. Stalin?s social policy was also an effective means of social control as it ensured the governments values were spread throughout society, by incentives, law or compulsory education. However, the Cult of Personality was the most effective manner in which Stalin gained loyalty and trust of the Russians, and ensured the popularity of communism, through the popular cult, even when the regime failed them. In this sense, this perception of Stalin, achieved by the Cult of Personality was the main form of social control in the 1930s. ...read more.

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