• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent were the German and Italian regimes under Hitler and Mussolini Totalitarian?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Robinson Wollersheim, No1 History Internal Assessment 1st Draft Nazism vs. Fascism R.Q.: To what extent were the German and Italian regimes under Hitler and Mussolini Totalitarian? i. Why? With this research I want to discover whether Hitler and Mussolini transformed Germany and Italy, respectively into Totalitarian regimes. In my discretion this played a major role when looking at traditions, respectability of countries and reputations of countries. Such "emotions" can also trigger wars, as we so in WWII. Initially, I feel that Dictatorships having absolute power over a country can cause many inconveniences for the citizens of it. Hence, I want to understand their motives and ambitions. Also, I figure that this is a very important time period in which milestones and new dimensions have been opened. Thirdly, I decided on this topic because I am a German citizen, who is naturally interested in the background and history of ones father country. ii. What? I am going to use a series of books written in different time periods by different writers from different countries. This shows a certain scope of viewpoints, which makes the answer to this question more objective. I am also going to use the Internet as one research option of my internal assessment. ...read more.

Middle

Catholicism was also seen as a possible threat to the emerging fascist state. Hence, a concordat was attempted to improve church-state relations. Catholicism was considered the religion of most Italians, which was so deeply rooted in Italian life that could directly endanger the position of the fascist might. iii. Education a. Germany i. Education in Germany was largely controlled by the Nazis. The main subjects were history, biology and physical education. All of course indoctrinated and altered to shine a good light on the Nazi party and its style of rule. Special schools were build for the "most talented". This meant that from a very young age onwards, children in Germany were focused on the Nazi ideology, similar to the Youths, which I will talk about in the next paragraph. b. Italy i. Education was focused on Fascist ideas and ideology. Children were educated in physical education and military training. These are just examples to illustrate what Mussolini wanted to achieve. iv. Youths a. Germany i. Various youths' existed in Nazi Germany, all aiming to control the mind of German children. Hitler once described his views concerning the purpose of youths:" When an opponent declares, 'I will not come your side', I calmly say: 'Your child belongs to us already...In a short time, they will know nothing else but this community." ...read more.

Conclusion

Germany vs. Italy ii. Conclusion a. When looking back at my research and all the information I collected during it, I think it is fair to say that both ideologies and those implementing it, transformed the respective countries to a large extent into totalitarian regimes. Although, I would say that this phenomena did not occur in the conventional way. By definition, a totalitarian regime controls every aspect of life. When looking at the moment they came to power and the day they left, a great difference in many senses can be seen. Especially, when looking at how they controlled the peoples' minds'. Propaganda, Force, Speeches, youths and discrimination are all factors, which increased their influence. This integrated so quickly into the respective countries roots, so that it was inevitable that people would eventually believe what they heard. They would also obey by it because they the how brutal their measures could be. Power conveyed and achieved by force was one feature in these regimes. The other means was propaganda. New technology, new innovations enabled them to convey their messages and slogans whenever they wanted. They could also reach every member of their "community". They not only controlled adults. One of their ideas was to transform the young so that their ideology would be carried further with the next generation. 1 http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=Nazism 2 http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=fascism 3 http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=totalitarian ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Hitlers Germany

    The collapse of the Great Coalition and the continuing economic chaos created a parliamentary crisis that opened the door to the so-called presidential system, built upon the extension of the president's constitutional powers. Article 48 of the Weimar constitution gave the president emergency powers to restore law and order in a crisis, including use of the army if necessary.

  2. Hitler and the Nazi Regime - revision sheet.

    Vienna - Jews left the office w/ visa and little else - their property confiscated. Nov 1938 50,000 Austrian Jews had emigrated Winter 1938-39 many laws against Jews came into effect Jan 1 1939 Jews forbidden to undertake any form of independent business activity, banned from visiting theaters, cinemas, concerts, and circuses Jan 1939 Heydrich (Himmler's right-hand man)

  1. To what extent can Hitler be considered to be "weak"?

    Looking at G.Noakes and D.Pridham (1984), " In any government, people tend to look at the head of government for instructions and decisions"6 Now, looking at this extract it is clear to say that in this case, in the Nazi government, people did not look at the head of the government (Hitler)

  2. How totalitarian was fascist Italy?

    It organised a mixture of sports, military drill, sports parades and propaganda lectures. Millions of school children were recruited into the Balilla, and all were required to sear an oath to the regime, swearing to carry out the orders of the Duce.

  1. Evaluate historical comparisons of Hitler and Stalin and their regimes

    It has only later been described as the earliest example of historical comparison of the two. The book is important as it introduces the concept of totalitarianism in a way to link Hitler and Stalin. The term totalitarianism is now widely accepted and used in comparative works of two, bracketed the two under this one category.

  2. Soviet State

    body responsible for the nations economy - was eradicated), and its mainly non-Bolshevik economic staff began to explore some of the problems of long-term planning. The political decision to adopt a long-term plan was taken in 1927. At the same time the government embarked on a number of projects such as the TurkSib railway and the Dnieper hydroelectric dam.

  1. To what extent was Gladstone's religion the driving force behind his attempt to 'sabotage' ...

    In his book The State in its Relations to the Church (1838), Gladstone raised the idea that religion and politics were inextricably linked: the Church was the conscience of the State, while the State had a duty to lend its consistent, unwavering support to the Anglican Church.

  2. "The Wannsee Conference was entirely responsible for the Holocaust" How valid is this assessment ...

    adding more to his Jewish conspiracy theory, I believe at this point Hitler is trying to convince himself that these theories are correct by adding specific points that align with what he is saying, including how they are all made up of ?one race exclusively? It is very important to

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work