• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Was Canadian participation in the Boer

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Was Canadian participation in the Boer war justified? The storm of war never comes alone, as it bring along extreme tragedy. "In 1899, the whole country was electrified when heard about the Imperial request from Britain."1 The Britain requested Canadians for help to defeat Boers in South Africa. This was the opportunity for Canada to demonstrate its importance in the British Empire and share in its military responsibilities but the "Canadian Prime Minister, Sir Wilfred Laurier, did not believe that Canada should be involved, but he faced growing agitation in English."2 Ultimately, the final decision, without any approval of Parliament3 was to support the Imperial request. This was Canadian army's first major overseas campaign. However, the decision to participate in Boer war resulted in a vast range of problems for a young country. First of all, the war had nothing to do with Canadians, it further increased conflicts between French-English Canadians, resulted in many other home front problems and even after all the efforts, Canadian contribution was not fully recognised. In the first place, interference in the war was absolutely unnecessary as the war had nothing significant to do with Canadians, "Although Laurier, too, was reluctant to commit Canadian troops and resources to a war that would not benefit Canadian interests; he found it more difficult to resist the pressure in English Canada for Canadian involvement." ...read more.

Middle

Ethnic groups, perhaps even more so than they do today, commonly saw themselves as superior to materialistic English Canadians. French Canadians opposed any participation. Interpreting the conflict as one to preserve a minority culture in the face of British imperialism, they sympathized with the Boers. Accordingly, the fight was purely a British one, and Canada should not be involved. The French opposition was lead by expressive French-Canadian nationalist, Henri Bourassa. Suspicious of the aims of British imperialism, Bourassa feared that Canadian participation would set as an example for involvement in future conflicts. "The French-Canadian opinion was certainly not massive on the issue, the majority supported Bourassa's views and saw Canada's entry into the war as an act of subservience to the British Empire."8 Bourassa argued, should go to war purely on the basis of its own national interests. The Montr´┐Żal riot broke out which was the most violent incident between French and English over the Canadian participation in war.9 In contrast, in English Canada, the excitement to show loyalty to Britain was extremely high. Not surprisingly, when the Boer War broke out, the tremendous enthusiasm in English Canada to fight for the mother country even though there was intense reaction in Quebec against the conflict. They were in complete favor of any imperial request by Britain. ...read more.

Conclusion

to do with Canadians, it further increased conflicts between French-English Canadians, resulting in many other home front problems and even after all the efforts, Canadian contribution was not fully recognised. The Britain requested Canadians for help to defeat Boers in South Africa. This was the opportunity for Canada to demonstrate its importance in the British Empire and share in its military responsibilities but there were infinite downsides to the decision to participate in war. It just alienated the whole nation into two. Canadians did not accomplish any objective other than intense misery and hardships throughout the nation and abroad. Perhaps, they would have never decided to participate and hence, would have never seen these horrific four years. 1 Benoit. Horizon Canada 7. Centre for the study of teaching Canada 2 Canadians and Conflicts. Edmonton Public School Board. 3 Wade. Mason. Search for a Nation. The Bryant press Limited, Toronto. 1967 4 Canadians and Conflicts. Edmonton Public School Board. 5Canadians and Conflicts. Edmonton Public School Board. 6 Miller. Carman. Canada's Little War. James Lorimer & Company LTD. Toronto 7 Canadians and Conflicts. Edmonton Public School Board 8 Haas. Suzanne. History Television. 2004 9 The Loyal Edmonton Regiment Museum. 27 December2001 10Reid. Brian. Canada at war and peace volume 1. Esprit Dr corps Books 11 Canadians and Conflicts. Edmonton Public School Board. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ibadat Bambrah ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. "To what extent did the Boer War change attitudes to Empire in Britain?

    and their inability to foresee this event which cost them not only the disrespect of their own people but also the humiliation worldwide. During the early months of the war Britain suffered a series of humiliating defeats at the hands of the Boers.

  2. Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a ...

    Soon, Radical Republicans (those who wished to use the victory as an opportunity to remake the South in the Yankee image) were in open conflict with Johnson. He attempted to terminate the FREEDMEN'S BUREAU (an agency established in 1865 to aid refugees)

  1. The British Security Coordination and Canadian Involvement in Clandestine Activities

    to encourage resistance in enemy-occupied Europe and Asia by sending agents to help organize and train local volunteers in sabotage, industrial demolition, ambush, disruption of communications and, in a few cases, to engage in the collection of specific intelligence.1 S.O.E.

  2. The Not So Free.

    have you got on the American response to our declaration of war". The guy responds with a deep serious voice "They intend to launch nuclear missiles on our major city's, some of which shall be launched from there missile bases in Turkey and West Germany".

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work