• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Was Hitler a weak dictator?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Was Hitler a weak dictator? The Third Reich, for Hitler, was supposed to have lasted 1000 years minimum, but it only lasted 12 years and four months. Many historians blame this on an individual that's Hitler himself. The argument is based on Hitler being actually a weak dictator that wasn't able to unite Germany as a new Fuhrer should had, also he didn't create the basis of a strong empire but hurried everything up putting on risk everything he had accomplished. As Germany 1918 to 1945 states 'The inconsistency and contradiction in Nazi Government arose entirely from the Fuhrer's weaknesses'. When Hitler establishes his control over Germany in 1933, his power was by no means absolute as Stephen Lee states. For example he never had emergency powers from Hindenburg's, this still gave the Weimar Republic a chance to control him. However, Hitler used the Weimar State's own political element, democracy, to destroy it. He strengthened the influence of the NSDPA to later put as many seats in the Reichstag as possible, he controlled meetings of other parties, and passed several laws (he had vast majority in the parliament) to grant him absolute powers over Germany. Nazi Germany definitely didn't have a head that controlled, ordered and imposed every action to be taken in the German territorylike Italy or Russia had. As an article published by the University of Wales states, 'it was a chaotic collection of individuals and organizations, all of which competed for power and influence'. The final idea here is that power was too spread all over different jurisdictions, and Hitler had delegated so many jobs to be done that sometimes different groups found them doing the same job. This created difficulties like opposition in the party itself and struggle for influence. A case of this is the roles that the SS and the Ministry of Propaganda played during Nazi Germany. ...read more.

Middle

What was actually a success for the Nazis was the self dissolved Centre Party, this excluded the church from any sort of political activity. Hitler's intentions towards the Churches pointed that he intended to a major extend to ban them, and leave Nazism as a major ideology. Some of his most important members were completely anti-religious and even attempted to the beliefs of both Protestants and Catholics. However, there was no report stating that this was bound to happen, or that the number of laity was reduced, in fact it rose during war time. So Hitler achieved to control political influence of the Church, but never reached the point were Nazism was stronger than religious beliefs, not even his role as dictator allowed him to do so. Finally, the opposition was never the reason why Hitler was removed from his place as leader of Germany, his failures during war time, partly his wrong foreign policy and, as usually happens to every dictatorship, the militaries condemned him. The relations with the army were a key point to his success on establishing a strong dictatorship. The army was pleased indeed by the militarist policies he intended to establish before being elected as prime chancellor, and as well by the economic support the government gave to the army during his dictatorship. The army, was the only strong group that could ruin Hitler's attempts to consolidate his power. So he tried to please them as far as possible, showing this way that he needed the army, to be leader of Germany. This was by 1934. In July 1934 Hitler along with the army obliterated the whole structure and leaders in of what historian Lee calls 'their own criminals', the SA, this was called The Night of the Long Knives The army wasn't pleased by the acts of the SA and saw them as a possible threat to their interests, and Hitler hated the image that the SA gave. ...read more.

Conclusion

obstacle, no matter his methods he had the courage to stand in front of the world powers and put his foreign policy to practice. I agree completely with Alan Bullock that states in "Hitler: A Study in Tyranny" that such a program would be due to, 'Hitler had only one program, power without limit, and the rest was window dressing'. As a final conclusion, the question of Was Hitler a weak dictator is too vague? We need a comparison with another dictator like Mussolini or Stalin in order to say if it was actually strong or not. However, as stated through the whole argument presented Hitler did things differently to other dictators, had a different view of how to rule Germany, how to expand it and how to establish a dictatorship. This makes analyzing his methods and ranking them with how successful he was the only way to find a final answer to the question. We can say that Hitler had a dictatorship based on an ideology. He made the people work for the Fuhrer and for the success of Nazi Germany as a new empire, this was a major achievement made by him. He didn't need to impose his power 100% by the use of force, rather he only needed to establish an ideology based nation. However, this also lead to disorganization and chaos among the political sphere of Germany, leaders confronting each other in order to please the Fuhrer, organizations with the same jurisdiction, etc. In this respect Hitler couldn't achieve what dictators like Stalin or Mussolini did, a country with one only and supreme leader. Nazi Germany wasn't a complete dictatorship if compared to others. What we aren't able to deny is that where Germany was going was clearly devised by Hitler, and that the final authority in Nazi Germany was him. He didn't have a strong dictatorship compared to Stalin of Mussolini, but a different one that was quite strong and achieved his main objectives. Jean Paul Hart 5/2/2007 L6B3 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To What Extent was fear of the Gestapo and the SS the main reason ...

    4 star(s)

    They made good use of technology such as bringing in the radio, making it cheap so as many Germans could hear the Nazi messages as possible. Their control of the printing press was not as easy as the radio, there were 4700 newspapers in Germany at the time and Goebbels

  2. Reasons for Napoleon's Success (to 1807).

    * Napoleon's enemies stopped employing old-fashioned methods with their armies. And learnt to play his own game. They copied his tactics, became more flexible, and developed their artillery to match his. They increased the size of their armies to equal or exceed his.

  1. Assess the view that the Holocaust was mainly a result of a long term ...

    T4, exhibit that public appreciation of appropriate action inevitably lagged behind that of policy makers, who were forced into secrecy.

  2. How far was the holocaust a long term plan of nazi racial policy?

    Henig supports the fact that the Madagascar plan was still the Nazis main plan in terms of dealing with the Jews by citing a diary entry by Goebbels on 17th April 1940 where he states that the Nazis are still intent on shipping the Jews to Madagascar.

  1. Causes of show trials + purges of 1930s.

    from the Provisional government and the resignation of Prince L'vov as leader of the government. This show of weakness within the government gave the spur to the so-called "July days" of early July 1917. The July days were a turning point in the period of dual power because the disturbances

  2. To what extent can Hitler be considered to be "weak"?

    However, Hitler became Chancellor to President Hindenburg in 1933 which meant Hitler did take part in any governmental proceedings. Hindenburg saw Hitler as a great speaker and a potentially good leader for Germany. It was when Hitler received the Enabling Act in 1933 that allowed him to acquire power to be able to produce his dictatorship.

  1. How successful were Nazi policies towards women?

    received a bronze cross, with six a silver cross and with eight children she would receive a gold cross. Despite these incentives, the birth rate did not respond in a significantly positive way to Nazi policy. Despite the fact that abortion was made illegal in 1933, the number of women who sought to terminate their pregnancies remained high.

  2. Hitlers Germany

    Germany was freed from the shackles of totalitarianism by outsiders, by foreign armies and by foreign sacrifices. Nationalist sentiment, disciplined obedience, and dazed inertia and apathy combined to stay the hands of Germans from doing even as much as the Italians had done.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work