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What do we learn about Charles I from Sir Philip Warwicks description of the King

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Introduction

What do we learn about Charles I from Sir Philip Warwick's description of the King We can learn numerous things about Charles I from Sir Philips Warwick's description of the King as it provides information both on his character and his appearance. Sir Philip Warwick shows that James was very aware of his royal status "His deportment was very majestic" He shows that Charles, unlike James, was very conscious of the correct and proper manner a monarch should conduct themselves,with great decorum. Furthermore, Warwick shows that Charles was careful to maintain his regal deportment and "majesty" as he "would be approached with respect and reverence", indicating Charles' need to be treated with great formality. Furthermore, Charles' to be treated with "reverence" suggests that he believes himself to have quasi godlike status as a result of his belief in his divine right to rule. ...read more.

Middle

In addition Sir Philip Warwick shows that Charles has a very limited academic knowledge as his "proportion of books was but small" as he was only interested in "necessary learning". Warwick shows that Charles "like Francis the First of France learnt more by the ear" though it is possible he is suggesting that Charles has more interest in court gossip than academia. A further way in which Warwick indicates that Charles is not clever is by showing that he stammers, "he was as slow a pen as of speech". Furthermore, Warwick shows that Charles is unskilled as he makes his officials write letters, " He would willingly make his own despatches, but that he found it better to be a cobbler than a shoe-maker" once again emphasizing his lack of intellect. ...read more.

Conclusion

and to show the popular perception of Charles great stature, shown in propaganda portraits was false. In addition, Sir Philip Warwick shows Charles to be extremely religious "His exercises of religion were most exemplary" Warwick illustrates how devout a Christian Charles was by showing "he never failed before he sat down to dinner to have part of the liturgy read unto him". However, Warwick shows that as a result of this strict religious observance must "reflect and be alone". It is possible that this is a criticism of Charles as the King is expected to be a public figure. Therefore, we learn many things about Charles I from Sir Philip Warwick's description of the king, such as his majesty, lack of learning and devout religious nature. Furthermore, we also get a sense that Sir Philip Warwick found Charles I frustrating as a result of his need to be treated with great formality and controlling nature. Francesca Osborne ...read more.

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