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What events and what aims brought the USA into the First World War?

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Introduction

What events and what aims brought the USA into the First World War? There were two main events that led to the USA entering the First World War. They are: * The German decision to wage war on any form of shipping near Britain and the mistake of attacking American vessels with American civilians on board. * The 'Zimmermann Telegram'. The Germans declared the sea around Britain a 'War Zone' and made the excuse that anything within this zone was fair game and they had the right to attack and destroy it. This included merchant ships shipping urgent supplies to Britain and also normal liners shipping people to and from Britain. ...read more.

Middle

But it is questionable if Germany would have been able to give very much 'support'. It was fighting a war on two fronts, although the Russian front looked like it was close to collapse and also, it was under a tight naval blockade and would not have been able to get anything out to Mexico. The USA intercepted the telegram and used it for propaganda reasons to enter the war. It can be said that America entering the war was inevitable. American industry was what was keeping the allies in the position they were in and American banks had allowed huge loans to the allies. ...read more.

Conclusion

It could almost be said that WW1 enabled the USA to come out of its isolationism and set the trend in world politics that continues to this day. The 14 points and also basic sense lead to the possibility that America came out of WW1 in the best position. They would reap the rewards of providing financial support and diplomatic relations with European countries would improve. American industry had not negatively been affected at all by the war and so was able to provide goods. There was a massive new market for them after the war. Goods were needed to rebuild nations torn apart by war and that could only have benefited the USA. ...read more.

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