• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What was the short term impact of the Montgomery Bus Boycott 1955-1957?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐What was the short term impact of the Montgomery Bus Boycott 1955-1975? The Montgomery bus boycott which was organised by the newly founded Mississippi Improvement Association occurred between 1955 and 1956 and it can be seen that the boycott was a turning point for civil rights; it showed Alabama that African Americans were serious, and willing to go to great lengths for their cause. It has successfully lasted for 381 days, as the Supreme Court had come to the conclusion that the bus segregation was unconstitutional. The success clearly shows the significance of the event, as it would have encouraged the black community to stand up for their rights, however the economic result of the boycott and the backlash from people who had opposed desegregation, could show that the boycott was not in fact significant in the Civil Rights Movement. Rosa Parks was a dignified and respected women, she was friendly to neighbours and believed strongly in equality. Her attitude and reputation already gave her the moral high ground against opponents. As E.D Nixon said ?nobody could point dirt at her? when she did something people figured it was the right thing to do? (1) the source could be seen biased as E.D Nixon was the president of the Alabama NAACP and Rosa Parks was part of this, however she was respected by many people so what he was saying can be trusted. ...read more.

Middle

King led the SCLC campaign in Albany, Georgia in 1961/2 and in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963, where he gave his famous ?I have a dream? speech which influenced hundreds of thousands of people, and it could be one of the reasons that led to the Civil Rights Act in 1964, which can only be attributed to King?s achievements in his campaigns, as without him and without the publicity and awareness he bought from his speeches the Civil Rights Act may not have come as soon as it did. When Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson succeeded J.F Kennedy he spoke about his ?developed compassion for the courageous struggles of African Americans during the Civil Rights movement?(7) and the way King had influenced him, which led to Johnson passing the Civil Rights Act. King?s efforts after the Bus Boycott shows that he had been able to make everyone aware of the cause in order to change the Civil Rights laws, and that without the Bus Boycott this would not have been possible. However, it could be seen that the Bus Boycott was not that significant as there were many disadvantages that came from it. The success of the Bus Boycott could suggest that the success of the case for bus desegregation was mainly for economic reasons and not in fact for justice and equality for the African Americans. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Freedom Rides achieved its aim in making the Government respond to this hostility as President John F. Kennedy provided federal marshals to help protect the Freedom Riders in the South. This implies that the Freedom Rides was what gained the attention of the government to ensure that segregation was outlawed. Therefore, this shows that the Freedom Rides can be seen as having a bigger impact on Civil Rights than the Montgomery Bus Boycott. In conclusion, I think that the Montgomery Bus Boycott had the biggest significance on the Civil Rights Movement, as due to the boycott, it impacted many events to come which had eventually led to the success of the Civil Rights Act in 1964. I don?t believe it would have been possible for the Civil Rights to have achieved this if it was not for the Civil Rights. As if it was not for the Bus Boycott Martin Luther King would not have emerged and changed the views of many Americans and built momentum for the Black Americans to fight for a change, as it had given them power due to the success of this event. Therefore, the short term impact of the Montgomery Bus Boycott was immense as this was the turning point in the Civil Rights Movement. 2238 words ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level History of the USA, 1840-1968 essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Assess the view that the Supreme Court was the most important branch of federal ...

    4 star(s)

    Kennedy, who was still afraid of losing the support of southern whites, but less so than earlier presidents, as he saw the need to keep order, and to enforce those decisions being made by the Supreme Court. Federal agents and soldiers were often made available by Kennedy to ensure that

  2. Describe the impact of the montgomery bus boycott

    It not only showed that violence isn't the only form of direct action, but demonstrated that these people were not the lower class unintelligent people that some whites had previously thought. The boycotters set up their own taxi and car pool services, highlighting how prepared and organised they were, they

  1. Short term impact of Malcolm X

    non-violence- or, as Malcolm puts it, self-defence vs. masochism- that he and other Civil-rights leaders disagree"33 On the other hand, Malcolm did manage to diversify the movement allowing others to follow something different than the ideas put forward by the likes of Martin Luther King.

  2. Linguistic Study - Linguistic Analysis of Martin Luther King's 'I Have a Dream', and ...

    Alliteration is evident again here ("Life, Liberty"), which makes these two abstract nouns more memorable. 'Cheque' Rhetoric Luther King compares the rights of all men to money and likens the promise of equal rights to a cheque - "America has given the Negro people a bad cheque..."

  1. What in your view was the short term significance of Malcolm X?

    Alex Haley is important in showing how significant Malcolm X was in doing this. Towards the end of the interview Haley says how X had been a speaker outside his church, attempting to persuade people to think as he did, and to think about how Black Americans had been treated

  2. How far was Martin Luther King's leadership responsible for the gains made by the ...

    The Supreme Court?s decisions in court cases such as Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954), Brown II (1955) and Browder v, Gayle (1956) picked apart the legal basis of segregation. These rulings were significant as they were used by civil rights activists to force changes in campaigns such as sit-ins across the southern states of America.

  1. Civil Rights Revision Cards 1945-68

    & to help black workers (but bill got stuck in Congress until pushed through by President Johnson after JFK?s assassination) However, 1. JFK moved slowly on CR (narrow election victory ? most US voters wanted gradual integration) 2. EEOC ? only limited success ? failed to bring about a significant increase in black employment in federal agencies 3.

  2. What was the short term significance of Malcolm X?

    So he often showed indecisiveness, whichis a damaging characteristic for a black representative because it misrepresents his supporters. Also Malcolm's solution to the problem wasBlack Nationalism"Our economic and social philosophy will be black nationalism"9. This is arguably black supremacy in disguise, which in itself is racist, so in fact this is contradictory to his condemnation of racism.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work