• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What Were The Significant Factors That Led To America's Involvement In the Spanish-American War?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Alex Day May 2, 2007 What Were The Significant Factors That Led To America's Involvement In the Spanish-American War? In the late 19th century the United States began to dramatically reshape their foreign policies, and they soon found themselves in a bloody war that would shape the future of the country for years to come. When the United States was first created George Washington recommended limited foreign involvement, this all changed in 1823 with the Monroe Doctrine. This document set out the entire western hemisphere as the United States sphere of influence. However, at the time the Unites States did not have the power or the navy to back up this demand, until the late 1880's when support for imperialism began to take off. People began to support imperialism because all other great powers had empires, strategic objectives became important, expanding the foreign market would support the economy, and social Darwinism was applied to nations, which meant that only the countries with the greatest wealth and largest empires would survive. As the 19th century came to a close, the United States saw an opportunity to put the Monroe Doctrine and a new sense of imperialism into action. At the time, Cuba was under going serious change, and was in the middle of a civil war with Spain. In 1895 a war escalated in Cuba to the point that 500, 000 Cubans were put into camps because of the ...read more.

Middle

Godkin who was the editor of the weekly Nation. Godkin frequently spoke out against Hearst and Pulitzer accusing them of gross misrepresentation, deliberate invention and unnecessary recklessness. He said "They were firebrands, tossed into the American crowd in an attempt to ignite a war."13 No matter how much Godkin spoke out against Hearst and Pulitzer, they continued to dominate the American public with their embellished stories and pro war slants. The American public's humanitarian concerns came into play after reading these articles. They soon believed how terrible the Cuban conditions were and began to plead the government to take aggressive steps towards Cuban independence. When the U.S. naval ship, the Maine, exploded in Havana Harbor, the American people, and their government were confused about what had happened and who had done it. Many fingers began to point at Spain, but even if Spain had not committed the crime, the suspicion alone by the American people was enough to push the war envelope a bit further. One of the final peaceful solutions to the problems in Cuba, presented by McKinley, was autonomy. This granted the country the right of self-government, however, a large portion of the Cuban population opposed autonomy and soon riots broke out. The battleship Maine simply arrived in Havana for a "friendly visit" on January 25, 1898 in response to pro-Spanish mobs.14 Suddenly, on the evening of February 15, 1898, at 9:45 PM, the Maine blew up, ...read more.

Conclusion

(New York: Facts on File, Inc., 1995), 5. 2 The Spanish American War, 1898, <http://dhsaphistory.tripod.com /SpanishAmericanWar.html> [May 2, 2007]. 3 Golay, America At War, 13. 4 Ivan Musicant, Empire By Default: The Spanish-American War and the Dawn of the American Century. (New York: Henry and Company, Inc., 1998), 81-83. 5 Frank Burt Freidel, The Splendid Little War. (Toronto: Little, Brown and Company Limited, 1958), 5-8. 6 Wayne Morgan, America's Road To Empire: The War With Spain and Overseas Expansion. (New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1968), ix-x. 7 The Spanish American War, [May 2, 2007]. 8 Golay, America At War, 14. 9 The Spanish American War, [May 2, 2007]. 10 Golay, America At War, 7. 11 Irving Werstein, 1898: The Spanish-American War. (New York: Cooper Square Publishers, 1966) 10. 12 Musicant, Empire By Default, 152. 13 Golay, America At War, 12. 14 Freidel, The Splendid Little War, 8. 15 Albert Nofi, The Spanish-American War, 1898. (Conshohocken: Combined Books, Inc. 1996), 42 16 Nofi, The Spanish-American War, 43. 17 Causes of the Spanish American War. <http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Great_Republic_By_the_Master_Historians_Vol_IV/causesof_c.html> [May 2, 2007]. 18 Causes of the Spanish American War, [May 2, 2007]. 19 Nofi, The Spanish-American War, 44. 20 The Spanish American War, [May 2, 2007]. 21 David Goldfield et al, The American Journey: A History of The United States. (Toronto: Prentice-Hall Canada Inc., 2002), 427. 22 Morgan, America's Road To Empire, 14. 23 The Spanish American War, [May 2, 2007]. 24 Goldfield, The American Journey, 430. 25 Goldfield, The American Journey, Appendix A-15 26 Goldfield, The American Journey, 427. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. To what extent did the foreign intervention influence the outcome of the Spanish Civil ...

    benefits and paid holidays, as well as attempts to reduce the top-heavy officer corps of the army through early retirement and with the 1931 constitution, he abolished the nobility and with Article 26, he was able to take extensive measures against the Church.

  2. How far has the historical, social and cultural development of America shaped the plays ...

    and Tennessee Williams would establish themselves as the leading dramatists of their time. Through their plays, both would respond - albeit in very different - to the confusions and turmoil of post-war American society. Arthur Miller (1915- ) Arthur Miller was born in New York to Jewish immigrant parents.

  1. &amp;amp;#145;In origins andoutcome, the Spanish Civil War was a Spanish and not a European ...

    The most effective way of assessing European intervention will be to examine in detail the stance and actions of each Great Power on a separate basis. 'In 1936, twenty-seven European nations formally adhered to non-intervention policy regarding the Spanish conflict9', however this proved to be negated in time.

  2. The American Revolution

    the Native Americans, many Colonists saw it as yet another attack upon their civil liberties. Once more, English attempts to safeguard the America's and retain British financial security had backfired, widening the distinction of what it meant to be an American, and a Briton.

  1. American History.

    since the Convention of 1818, but when "Oregon Fever" broke loose in 1841 fervid expansionists began demanding the entire area for the US ["Fifty-four forty or fight"]. - Naturally, expansion into Oregon and the rejection of Texas worried Southern leaders, who responded by convincing the 1844 Democratic convention to use

  2. What were the causes and consequences of Italy's involvement in the Spanish Civil War?

    It was retaliation towards France as they had recently elected a popular front Government, to which fascist Italy was opposed, into power and despite signing a non-intervention pact with Britain, France showed open, mainly passive support, for the Republicans in Spain so by supporting the rebels showed France that they

  1. Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a ...

    Nonetheless, the economic centralization long reflected in the NAVIGATION ACTS--which compelled much of the colonial trade to pass through Britain on its way to the European continent--served to remind colonials of the heavy price exacted from them for membership in the empire.

  2. Lion Led By Donkeys

    The majority of the public believed that the British soldiers were lions, but donkeys led them and that the Generals were stupid who could not think of ideas to win the war apart from the slaughtering men until one side was ground into submission.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work