• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

When did the Cold War begin?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

When did the Cold War begin? Plan of the investigation. Section A The Cold War was a period of conflict between America and the USSR. This was caused by a number of factors including social and economic differences. Their two political systems of capitalism and communism were at complete opposites of the political scale. This conflict never became a 'hot war' but continued through many non-confrontation means such as propaganda and the funding of opposing sides in external conflicts. Because there was never 'hot war' the question of when the Cold War began has been a point of debate. The more orthodox historians such as Arthur M Schlesinger have the view that the Cold War started after the end of the Second World War and was started by the USSR. Others have said that it was the conflict between America and Russian communists in the Bolshevik revolution of 1917. Others have said that it may have been foreign forces intervention in the Russian civil war. Others agree that it was mid way through the Second World War when American forces became more pro active. In this investigation I will try to determine when exactly the Cold War started. Much of the research for this will be from two sources. ...read more.

Middle

The two main missing factors were, firstly around the time of the revolution the country was in a civil war and the USSR did not exist. This meant that there was not the powerful soviet state for the Americans to fear. Secondly because the USSR did not exist there was no war of propaganda or the funding of external communist movements that caused the majority of friction between the two countries later in the Cold War. This desire for expansionism was to cause America increasing concern later. When in 1922 Russia merged with five neighbouring states to form the Soviet Union. By 1936 five more states joined. This meant that in less than 15 years Russia had amassed an area the size of Europe. At this time there were increasing signs that America and the USSR were become more and more uneasy. The USSR's expansionism was starting to threaten the rest of Europe there was continuing talk of a communist revolution in countries such as Germany. But again as at the 1917 revolution there was not any public statement from either side that there was a disagreement from either side. The Second World War was also an important factor in this. The Yalta and Potsdam conferences where allied leaders and Stalin met could be seen as the starting point of the Cold War. ...read more.

Conclusion

This means that the most likely start of the Cold War was just after the Potsdam conference. Although there was little propaganda all the other elements were there and it was the first time that the serious differences between the USSR and America became obvious. The time frame found in this conclusion supported by the two texts I choose to focus on. Although they state different events for the start the time frame is the same. in the 'Origins of the Cold War' the start of the cold war is portrayed as "The point of no return came on July 2, 1947, when Molotov, after bringing 8 technical specialist with him to Paris and evincing initial in the project for European reconstruction, received the hot flash from the Kremlin denounced the whole idea and walked out of the conference. "s Were as in America, Russia and The Cold War the start of the cold war is implied as "The Cold War began with the almost simultaneous "declarations of Cold War" by Comrade Stalin and Prime Minister Churchill in 1946, followed by President Truman in 1947."l p. 39 List of sources The origins of the Cold War 1941 - 1949 second edition Martin McCauley Cold War Europe 1945 -1991 a political history second edition John w young On Every Front: The Making of the Cold War Thomas G. Paterson (1979) Adam Timmins History When did the Cold War begin? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Who was responsible for the start of the Cold war?

    In it's content he had similarly highlighted the incompatibility of the communist and capitalist systems and therefore it cannot be too surprising that Truman now recognised this as well however, Stalin's reaction to Marshall aid was on of hostility. Many countries within the Soviet sphere of influence that could have

  2. Origins of the Cold War.

    in 1950 Truman aoorived development of ne H bomb stronger than one used in 1945. The National Security Act created a new Departmen of Defense which would oversee all armed services. A National Security Council out of thw white house would govern forign and military policy.

  1. How far was the USSR responsible for the outbreak of the Cold War?

    crisis following the harsh winter of 1946-47 and the growth of the communist parties in Italy and France were related thus making the Americans believe that strong economies could fight against communism. This could be seen as evidence for the drive of US leaders for dominance, as there would be

  2. What were the Main Causes of the Cold War? and Which of these Causes ...

    Due to Britain and France's own difficulties, they were obviously reluctant to help the country that had originally caused them to be in that state. The U.S allowed some economic revival in the three zones. Stalin was furious, his hatred of Germany was immense.

  1. The Cold War was a big rivalry that developed after World War II.

    abolished the Comintern, or Communist International, which had been organized in 1919 to foment communist revolutions in other countries. [This brings favorable comment from most Americans, including Joseph Davies, ambassador to the Soviet Union, Eric Johnston, president of the US Chamber of Commerce and even Rep.

  2. The Marshall Plan.

    As for the Soviets, Marshall concluded that they had decided to stall in the expectation that the spreading social disintegration would work to their benefit. Their attitude reminded Marshall of the 1944 proposal by Secretary of the Treasury Henry Morgenthau to break up and pastoralize Germany, and when he returned

  1. This graduation paper is about U.S. - Soviet relations in Cold War period. Our ...

    policymakers to open up Eastern Europe for trade and investment. Within such a frame of reference, it was the capitalist economic system-not Soviet commitment to world revolution-that made the Cold War unavoidable. Still a third version of the inevitability hypothesis-partly based on the first two-would insist that historical differences between

  2. What were the main issues relating to Germany that caused Cold War tension?

    These Russian sensitivities were not irrational, just impractical. The Potsdam agreement allowed for reparations to be taken from one's own zone. But this was to be done with complete centralised accounting, and contradicted the principle of Germany functioning as a single economic unit, which was also agreed at Potsdam as

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work