• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Which group made more progress as a result of World War Two: American women, or American black people?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Which group made more progress as a result of World War Two: American women, or American black people? Women and black people both suffered before the war; jobs, rights and wages were all very different to white men who were definitely considered superior. But the question is, who progressed more in the time of World War Two? Regardless to say, both groups progressed, but by how much? Who really was better off after the war? Before the war women didn't have much opportunity in the job market. Women were expected to be the perfect housewives as well as being thought of as weak and not clever enough to do "proper" jobs which the men were employed to do. There was much inequality between women and men and very stereotypical views of both sexes. Men were allowed to do as they wished and women were treated as possessions as opposed to people. Women cleaned, cooked and looked after the men because it was their supposed "duty" to do so. I think that women before the war were very much insignificant to America's economy. Blacks before the war had little to no opportunity in the job market. They were often extremely badly paid, and looked down upon by the rest of the community. ...read more.

Middle

Blacks were totally segregated from their community which made it difficult for them to have any opportunity whatsoever, and which also made it practically impossible to compete with white men. Black people before the war suffered immense discrimination and racism towards their whole race. Even at the start of the war they suffered with prejudice and segregation. The biased views based on the traditional viewpoint of the Black race, and the separation of races in schools, restaurants, transport etc. cut black people off from the rest of the world, and all because of the colour of their skin. Black Americas campaigned for civil rights during the war with many non-violent protests organised by the Congress of Racial Equality, and when there were plans for a protest involving 100,000 people, President Roosevelt was forced to ban discrimination against Blacks in government and industrial jobs and set up the Fair Employment Practise Committee. The government also tried to help Blacks by tracking down businesses who didn't employ them and threatening not to give contracts to these firms unless they changed their ways. The discrimination laws against Blacks did not apply to the Armed Forces and at the start of the war, the Army would not train Black Officers. Blacks in the Air Force could not be pilots and blacks in the Navy could only work in the kitchens. ...read more.

Conclusion

I think the most important bit of permanent progress though, was that by the end of the war, four states had made equal pay for women compulsory which was a big step forwards as this showed that women's rights were on the rise. For Black people, there was also change. They were now accepted in the defence industry as well as a few other lines of work. Their pay was still less than white men but they were becoming part of the society that had previously rejected them. Unfortunately, there was still a lot of discrimination and the change that the war had brought was not all permanent. So who made the most significant progress as a result of World War Two? Well, in my opinion it is easy to say that women did. Although Black people were becoming more accepted n society, and their rights were improving, women had much ore permanent change and a better deal overall. Women were now being recognised as individuals as opposed to men's possessions, and they were being paid more in certain parts of America. They became more respected in the workplace and at home and the numbers of working women just kept increasing, between 1940 and 1960 the percentage of married women with jobs almost doubled. As a result of World War Two and the opportunities given to them, women became much more independent and progressed mo than the Black community. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. In what ways did the Second World War affect the lives of ordinary people ...

    They were depended on to manage serious situations in bombing raids and such like, that before the war would have been considered too important to be arranged by a woman. Many women there fore felt more appreciated and occupied than previously, so wanted to contribute.

  2. Could the American War of Independence Have Been Avoided?

    So was this change in America's attitude inevitable? I feel that many of these areas of resentment could have been avoided if the new British government had recognised the potential for grievances and acted with more sensitivity towards her colony. Such as with the issues of trade, Britain should have realised that America would not take kindly to

  1. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    Some Israelis envisioned a Shia buffer state modeled after "Free Lebanon," controlled formerly by Saad Haddad (Haddad died of cancer in January 1984 and was replaced by retired Lebanese general Antoine Lahad). Indeed, about 10 percent of the SLA was Shia, and the IDF armed and supported several Shia groups.

  2. While surfing the channels on TV you might hear a lot of news about ...

    Naturally the biggest amount of tragic terror attacks happen in Israel, but other parts of the world should be important as well and we should take the happenings there serious as well. To tell the truth I have an impression that not all the news reach us.

  1. Armed forces.

    The people themselves could move around the empire whether for business or for pleasure; families could be reunited more regularly, farmers could travel longer distances to get their products to market, businessmen could entertain clients from further afield. Even within relatively short distances and in crowded areas people wanted to enjoy the benefits of the train system.

  2. The American Revolution

    The Stamp Act Congress was called into session in New York City in 1765 and brought together representatives from nine separate colonies. After a number of spirited debates, the delegates drew out a list of grievances against the King and his government and pleaded with him to repeal the Stamp Act.

  1. In What Ways If Any Did Life On the Home Front Change As a ...

    This caused a lot of trouble in the Government because it was against the general policy of the Liberal Party to interfere in some then people's lives and therefore taking away their freedom. Source G3 helps us to understand the Conscription act and the effects that it had on certain

  2. Dominicans, America's Growing People for the New Millennium

    It seems as though when the Dominican population in America increases, their income as a whole decreases. Nearly half of the Dominicans in NYC live below the poverty level. In 1990 29% of Dominicans where on welfare. Of foreign people immigrating to the U.S., only people from the former Soviet

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work