• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Which Was the Most Important Reason for the Bolshevik Consolidation of Power By 1924, the Red Terror or the New Economic Policy.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Which Was the Most Important Reason for the Bolshevik Consolidation of Power By 1924, the Red Terror or the New Economic Policy. By 1924 the Bolsheviks had succeeded in consolidating their power over Russia. This was partly due to two new ideas they adopted during their reign. The first was the Red Terror, a brutal yet effective method of control. They disposed of their opposition and frightened people into obeying them. The second method they used was the New Economic Policy, an altogether more democratic approach to the situation. The New Economic Policy won them popularity, thereby giving them power through the support of the population of Russia. Following an assassination attempt on Lenin in August 1918 the Bolsheviks launched the Red Terror. The Cheka (Bolshevik secret police) were unleashed on their opponents. Lenin was obsessed with protecting the revolution and that was why the Cheka were set up. Mass executions and on the spot shooting were used to intimidate any opposition. People weren't just executed there were many that were sent to labour camps. Inmates in these labour camps were treated as slaves. They were free labour for the government to use as needed. Many died from the inhumane conditions they had to live in. ...read more.

Middle

Everyone respected the Bolsheviks because they had to. No one knew if a Cheka spy was watching and planning their execution. True communists supported this choice totally as it was sticking to communism even if it was a little harsh on the economy, but everyone else just wanted an end to the war and the famine. Although the Bolsheviks maintained their control and consolidated their power to an extent, it would only last temporarily. As soon as the civil war ended the peasants would revolt and demand an end to the famine. It was the Kronstadt rising that led directly to the New Economic policy being introduced, however Lenin had realised a change of policy had been needed for a while. The Kronstadt rising in March 1921 was when the sailors at the naval base near Petrograd mutinied and demanded an end to the communist dictatorship and the forced grain seizures. Their fortress was stormed with 50,000 red army troops. Of the sailors, 2,000 were executed without trial, 8,000 fled the country and thousands more were sent to labour camps. These sailors had previously been supporters of communism. Trotsky himself had called them the pride and glory of the Russian revolution. ...read more.

Conclusion

If it hadn't of been for the civil war the peasants would have revolted against the grain seizures, as they did soon after the war. The only reason they stayed loyal to the Bolsheviks throughout was because it was their best option. If they had let the whites take over they would have lost all the gains they made through the October revolution. Whereas the NEP won the Bolsheviks true support from the majority of the population. The NEP sorted out the economy and some of the social issues in Russia and once again it was becoming a stable, peaceful country. Although there were some political problems because of disagreements about the NEP, overall it was a much better policy than the Red Terror. The Terror lost thousands of people their lives and everyone lived in fear; the country was wrought with famine and disease. It's as though the NEP cured all this. Russia was a difficult country to rule. So many people with so many views meant it was impossible to please everyone. Neither of these policies could keep everyone happy so it was best to use the one that kept the majority happy. The NEP was most important in consolidating the Bolshevik rule as it stabilised the country and kept most of the population happy and therefore happy with the way the country was being run and thus content with the Bolshevik rule. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. To what extent did Mussolini consolidation of power in Italy between 1922 and 1928 ...

    Parliament became a place of theatre where Fascist supporters would applaud his decisions. Democratic elections no longer took place, as all candidates had to be Fascist or Fascist approved. Mussolini was not prepared to share power with his ministers, which meant there was no cabinet team to discuss policy.

  2. How important was Lenin in the consolidation of Bolshevik rule by 1924?

    However, the Germans were making excessive demands. Trotsky pulled out of the peace talks and refused to sign. Lenin managed to persuade the Russian representatives except Trotsky to sign and end the war. He knew that Russia's army couldn't hold up against the Germans for much longer.

  1. To what extent was Hitlers rise to power due to Economic Problems?

    This would answer the question that Hitler was not responsible for his rise to power. However, this is seemingly ridiculous as no one could have foreseen the effects that putting Hitler in power would have caused and from the facts we can see clearly that it was Hitler himself who

  2. The New Economic Policy - War communism.

    In the towns, small factories were handed back into private ownership and private trading of small good was allowed. Lenin made it clear that the NEP was temporary and the vital heavy industries (coal-oil-iron-steel)

  1. Lenin and the Bolshevik revolution.

    quo, as seemed possible, except that the liberals (for whom the railway workers had no special affection) and Kerensky would have been excluded from government. On October 29, a further statement was issued which is revealing of the railwaymen's basic concern with stability: A people that is opposed to the

  2. Free essay

    The consolidation of power

    But Hitler was in power in 1934, and there was no opposition left - the SA were an embarrassment, not an advantage. Also, Rohm, the leader of the SA, was talking about a Socialist revolution and about taking over the army.

  1. War communism and NEP

    The most unpopular aspects of War communism were affecting the peasants. They had little choice over the requisitioning of grain and the plans to rid the Mir, a village commune. When the civil war was over, all these problems threatened stability within the Bolshevik regime and caused huge problems for the Bolsheviks in consolidating their rule.

  2. The Impact of Stalins Leadership in the USSR, 1924 1941. Extensive notes

    were many more being recruited ï large numbers of technical specialists and people from an intellectual background. 5. 1941: Only 14.9% of members were female. 6. 1939: In the Politburo, there were only three men ï Khrushchev, Zhdanov and Beria who had all been promoted by Stalin.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work