• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why and with what success did Charles V spend much of his reign in conflict with the Ottoman Empire?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why and with what success did Charles V spend much of his reign in conflict with the Ottoman Empire? Charles was not very successful in achieving his ambitious aims, which included personal glory and advances into existing Muslim territory, whilst in conflict with the Ottomans. He was in conflict with the Ottoman Empire for much of his reign because as Holy Roman Emperor he saw it as his duty to defend Christendom against the Ottoman threat, he ambitiously aimed to expand his territories and aimed to achieve personal glory for himself by waging a 'holy war' against the Ottoman Empire. Although he was largely unsuccessful in expanding his territories and achieving personal glory for himself, Charles's efforts to defend Europe can be described as successful. Charles V's aims and ambitions as Holy Roman Emperor meant that he saw it as his duty to defend Christendom against the Ottoman threat. When Charles V became Holy Roman Emperor in 1519 one of his main aims was to defend his dominions of disruptive attack from without. Therefore, in reply to the Ottoman Turks advances, Charles's primary aim was defend his territories and, as such territories lay on the front line, to defend Christendom as a whole. Such ambitious aims meant that he spent much of his reign trying to achieve them. The defence of the Mediterranean was crucial to Charles. ...read more.

Middle

By 1543 Suleiman had consolidated most of his control over Hungary and in 1547 Ferdinand was made to agree to a humiliating truce in which he had to pay tribute money for the small area of land that remained under his control. However Charles was not entirely unsuccessful in defending Eastern Europe. In 1532 Charles defeated the Turks at Guns and triumphantly liberated Vienna. Yet Charles was unwilling to further capatalise on this success and left for Italy immediately afterwards. Therefore within Eastern Europe, although Charles did loose some land to the Turks and was unsuccessful in giving aid to his brother because of events and pressures elsewhere, he successfully adopted a policy of containment and stopped the Ottoman advance within Eastern Europe. Therefore Charles was relatively successful in defending in his territory overall. He was most successful in the Mediterranean and although he did loose land in the East he achieved his ultimate aim by ensuring the Turks were no longer a threat to his dominions within Europe. Charles also ambitiously aimed to expand his territories and lead Christendom in a crusade against the infidel forces of Islam to recover Christian land that had been taken by the Turks during the 15th century. This meant that he spent much of his reign in a 'Holy War' with the Ottoman s. As a youngster Charles had grown up to become a devout Catholic and he acquired a strong anti-Islamic prejudice through his Burgundian ancestry, who were very proud of their crusades against the 'infidel'. ...read more.

Conclusion

His victory at Guns in 1532 was boost for his personal status because he managed to persuade the Protestant princes to support him and he led his armies personally into battle. His reputation, however, suffered in many other areas. Firstly he suffered a humiliating and disastrous defeat at Algiers inn 1541, which shattered his personal reputation. He also was forced to make a series of compromises with the Turks, which humiliatingly contradicted his aims and weakened his personal reputation as the secular leader of Christendom. In 1535 he entrusted Tunis to an Ottoman ally and in 1547 Charles allowed Ferdinand to sign a truce with Suleiman which sealed Hungary's take over of a Hungary. Therefore Charles's aim to achieve personal glory whilst in conflict7 and to reconvert Ottoman areas to Christianity was never fulfilled. In conclusion Charles was in conflict with the Ottoman Empire for much of his reign because as Holy Roman Emperor he saw it as his duty to defend Christendom against the Ottoman threat, he ambitiously aimed to expand his territories and aimed to achieve personal glory for himself by waging a 'holy war' against the Ottoman Empire. As A whole Charles's efforts to defend Europe can be described as successful, however he failed to make any substantial advances into Ottoman territory, largely because of distractions elsewhere in his dominions, and did not always achieve his aim of personal glory. On balance, therefore, Charles was not very successful in his conflict with the Ottomans. Page 1 John Round ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Why did Charles V fail to crush Luther?

    and through Luther's teaching of 'Faith alone' gaining salvation they saw the benefits of less money being spent. People in the cities and groups such as the middle classes were also greatly willing and able to respond to Luther's message, due to heightening political, social and religious awareness and the high levels of literacy.

  2. This essay examines the actions of Charles VII in relation to events pertaining to ...

    all of her relationships-with Charles, the Burgundians, the English and ultimately with the church. She cites Joan's courage and tenacity of vision and her confidence in divine support. Knight, Kevin. "Pragmatic Sanction." The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume XII (Online). New York: Robert Appleton Company, 2002.

  1. Henry V Assignment

    Act 2, Scene 2, Line 47. Cambridge thinks that Henry should spare his life but punish him never the less. "So may your highness, and yet punish too." Cambridge, Act 2, Scene2, Line 48. Thomas Grey thinks that he should be executed. "Sir, you show great mercy if you give him life, after the taste of much correction."

  2. Arabi israli conflict

    The same day as the British mandate ended 14th May 1948, a man named David Ben Gurion who was a leader of the Jews in Palestine, a Zionist, declared that the state of Israel now existed. But this created the problem of Palestinian Refugees.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work