• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did America become increasingly involved in the affairs of Vietnam.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

History GCSE Coursework Candidate Name: Candidate Number: Vietnam Post 1939 Assignment 2 Why did America become increasingly involved in the affairs of Vietnam. From 1939 to 1968, America's involvement in Vietnam gradually increased. In this space of time, they turned from ally, to enemy. When the Second World War finished, the nuclear age began, and this increased American involvement further against communism, which led to them turning their back on Vietnam. In the Second World War, America supported Vietnam against Japan, as they saw Vietnam as a good place to set up camp as it is near to Japan, their enemy at the time. Five years after the war had finished, in 1950, Vietnam were no longer needed, and America hastily turned on Vietnam, as they believed they were close to falling to communism. In 1949, the communist Russia teamed with China who had fell to communism that year. The united and independent Vietnam joined the two as allies. America had found a pattern in the spread of communism, called the 'Domino Effect'. ...read more.

Middle

This left the north prone to communism. From here it was inevitable America would get involved. On the same day, both North and South Vietnamese representatives met with representatives of France, Great Britain, the Russia, America, China, and the neighbouring states, Laos and Cambodia, in Geneva, to discuss the future of Indo-China. At this conference, it was agreed to divide Vietnam along the 17th parallel. This meant giving the north to the communists, and the south to the Saigon government. On October 24th 1954, the American president, Dwight Eisenhower, backed South Vietnam against the north, in an attempt to shut out the communism. In 1955, South Vietnam was made a republic, with anti communist leader Ngo Dihn Diem, as president. Ngo Dihn Diem's appointment was seen by many as a fix. After this and with John F. Kennedy taking over as American president in 1961, America continued their support to the south, with the treaty of amity and economic relations. This increased American involvement as they were supplying army aid to the south. ...read more.

Conclusion

In 1968, America stepped up their interest further. 'Operation Phoenix', by the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency), stated that America had to arrest at least 3,000 Viet Cong a month. In the same year, the 'Tet Offensive' was launched by the North Vietnamese General Vo Nguyen Giap. It was a series of attacks on American targets. In this attack, The Viet Cong loose 85,000 troops but it is seen to the world as a home win. That same year, America conducted 'My Lai', a search and destroy scheme, kept low key by America. In all of the information I have reviewed, the bottom line of the question 'Why did America become increasingly involved in the affairs of Vietnam', is that they were trying to impede a communist revolution talking place in Vietnam. America had previously tried to bully countries into being anti communist (Russia, China) and were doing it again. 1963 was a key year in the war, as Kennedy is assassinated and LBJ takes over. I believe that if Kennedy would have stayed in charge, American involvement would have been minimal, as I don't believe he would have capitalised on the 'blank cheque' as LBJ did. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. Why Did the United States of America Become Involved In Vietnam?

    " further... There are always two sides to story and this speech only gives us a one sided story, the Americans. At this stage for reading the extract you can not tell if this source is reliable. To make sense of this study, I would have to carry out my

  2. What were the reasons for America to become increasingly involved in Vietnam? The second ...

    To "save" the peasants from the Vietcong, Diem organised a system where by whole villages were moved into defended camps, known as fortified villages. This policy backfired, as the peasants did not want to be removed from their land. Unfortunately for Diem this policy played into the hands of the

  1. History Coursework on Hammersmith and Fulham

    Source L is an account of the experiences of a seven year old girl, Barbara Walsh, fifty years after the Second World War. According to source L it suggests there wasn't a great strain on the welcoming women even though the child was not with their parents.

  2. Many peoples have contributed to the development of the United States of America, a ...

    In 1972 the Democrats nominated for the presidency Sen. George MCGOVERN of South Dakota, a man who for years had advocated women's rights, black equality, and greater power for the young. With the nation's increasingly conservative cultural mood and the trend in Vietnam, Nixon won a massive landslide victory.

  1. How Did America Become Increasingly Involved In Vietnam

    French troops stationed in their colonies were withdrawn back to their falling country, Vietnam being one of these colonies. Japan instantly seized its chance and occupies the 'empty' country. They allowed the French administration to stay until they ousted it in the early months of 1945 and called Vietnam its own.

  2. History Coursework - Vietnam Assignment

    as normal villagers, this being the reason for the My Lai Massacre. The Vietcong appeared as normal villagers having no uniform or mark to say that they were any different from the peasants of Vietnam. They gained the peasants support, which the American troops' did not achieve.

  1. American History.

    based almost entirely on cotton. This was due to Eli Whitney's invention of the cotton gin in 1793, which separated short-staple [the easy to grow kind] cotton from its seeds efficiently. Although the South was in internat'l markets, it remained a rural society, w/most of the wealth in land and

  2. Explain why the United States became increasingly involved in Vietnam

    By 1963 there were 16,000 of them. Then gradually the amount of men involved in Vietnam increased until in 1968 the amount of American men in Vietnam reached a staggering 536, 000 men. Another main reason why the US became increasingly involved in Vietnam was because of the 'Cold War' against the Soviet Union (Russia).

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work