• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why did Parliament win the English Civil War? There is no simple explanation that explains why Parliament won the English Civil War; there were many factors that culminated in the reformation of England into a republic. These factors consist of fundamental advantages that Parliament had before the commencement of battle (tax revenues for example) and specific events during the war (such as victorious battles). At the commencement of the Civil War in 1642, both the Parliamentarians and the Royalists had certain advantages over eachother, although it is popularly perceived that Parliament's advantages outweighed those of the Royalists. One of Parliament's advantages was that they controlled some of the more economically advanced areas of the country (most significantly the Southeast), this was an important factor as it allowed a more efficient production of weapons and other wartime essentials. Parliament also occupied areas with lots of armouries and troops, a prime example being Hull, which was a rich source of arms and also supplied an army of some 16,000 troops. ...read more.

Middle

Parliament went into the war with all the aforementioned advantages, however these were no substitute for the events that occurred during the war. Throughout the war both sides' armies stubbornly remained in their locality for fear of their homes being plundered, with one notable exception; in 1643 London's trained bands left their posts to help their counterparts further north. This was not a hugely significant factor but nevertheless it contributed to the Parliamentarian war effort. By late 1643 another dilemma had mutually occurred among the respective sides. This dilemma was a lack of troops. The natural step was to seek the help of the Scots, and both sides attempted to do so. The Scots however were opposed to the King after he had, a few years earlier, attempted to implement an Arminian prayer book into Scotland, this had led to war so the Scots sided with Parliament. This signified a huge setback to the Royalists and a great achievement for Parliament. ...read more.

Conclusion

This battle in 1644 signalled the end of the King's northern stronghold and was therefore a significant factor in Parliament's eventual success. A yet more decisive battle came in June 1645 on the grounds of Naseby. Here came the definite realisation of the Parliamentary victory to come when, the Royalist's last main field army was beaten by Cromwell, Fairfax and their many pawns. Then came the final major battle of the English Civil War; the battle of Longport- a mere formality for the Parliamentarians, its only significance derived from the perspective of hindsight when its finality is demonstrated. This was effectively the end of the war. The aforementioned battles laid the foundations for and signalled the end of The English Civil War and Parliament's consequent escalation to sole governors of England and her lands. In conclusion, it is not possible to state one reason or event that, beyond all others, was responsible for Parliament's victorious Civil War campaign. A whole plethora of factors were responsible for Parliament's feat and it was the amalgamation of these factors that led to their victory. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay


**
There are a number of factors responsible for Parliament's victory in the Civil War; Resources, Building Armies, Making Alliances, Political Struggles & Battles are the main ones. Each one deserves a paragraph explaining in what way it was a contributing factor with evidence to support the point. This answer is relatively brief - more of an overview which would lose marks due to lack of detail and supporting evidence. Examiners tend to award marks for a level of thinking and this is why it is important not to rewrite chunks of a textbook but to think, organise, select and then deploy evidence in order to persuasively argue a point. Strong focus on the question is paramount and links should be explicit not implicit. Overall, this answer has elements in it which answer the question but it is not sustained or developed. It would also benefit from better organisation and planning.

Marked by teacher Natalie Stanley 08/01/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Why did Parliament win the First Civil War?

    Politically, John Pym was very important until his death in 1643. He kept Parliament's war effort together and his leadership was vital to the Earl of Essex's survival in the war. He made sure that all of Parliament were for defeating the King and the Royalist forces as the were

  2. Henry VII and His Money.

    At its worst this meant that children were virtually auctioned off to the highest bidder. Henry's cultivation of this source of revenue was such that the income-of �200 which he received in 1487 was increased to �6,000 by 1507. Another example of an ancient right attached to the Crown which Henry exploited was his granting of Town Charters.

  1. What Caused The English Civil War ?

    He had to pay the Scots to leave England. This war caused financial difficulties. In 1626 Charles asked Parliament to raise money for him and Parliament refused because they thought Charles wasn't spending his money wisely. He was mainly spending his money on artwork by Van Dyke and Ruben.

  2. Why did the English Reformation happen?

    King Henry dissolved some of the monasteries that were not doing their jobs properly and wasting the Church's money they received from people buying indulgences. People bought indulgences because they thought they would get through purgatory more quickly. The money also came through people giving money to the Church.

  1. Charles V - An Evaluation Of Success And Failures.

    In the great biography by Karl Brandi, the foundation of modern studies of Charles V, attention is focused on Charles in northern Europe, where his setbacks were greatest. He might be thought of as more of a success if he is viewed as a Mediterranean monarch rather than a world emperor.

  2. How successfully did James deal with religious problems throughout his reign?

    Puritanism was not static and unchanging. At first it simply stood for further reform of worship but it soon began to attack episcopacy as unscriptural. At the Hampton Court Conference, a Puritan minister used the term 'presbytery' frequently; this angered James who conclusively said 'no bishop, no king'.

  1. The causes of the English civil war.

    The unrest continued in Scotland, and when Charles discovered that they had been plotting with the French he again decided to mount a military expedition. This time, Charles called Parliament in order to get funds (1640). The second cause was the financial quarrels between the king and parliament.

  2. Why did the civil war break out in 1642?

    Worst of all for Charles, his most able minister, the Earl of Strafford, was put on trial by Parliament and executed for treason. Archbishop Laud was imprisoned. Up until 1641, Parliament had been united against the King but now it began to split.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work