• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did Parliament win the English Civil War?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why did Parliament win the English Civil War? There is no simple explanation that explains why Parliament won the English Civil War; there were many factors that culminated in the reformation of England into a republic. These factors consist of fundamental advantages that Parliament had before the commencement of battle (tax revenues for example) and specific events during the war (such as victorious battles). At the commencement of the Civil War in 1642, both the Parliamentarians and the Royalists had certain advantages over eachother, although it is popularly perceived that Parliament's advantages outweighed those of the Royalists. One of Parliament's advantages was that they controlled some of the more economically advanced areas of the country (most significantly the Southeast), this was an important factor as it allowed a more efficient production of weapons and other wartime essentials. Parliament also occupied areas with lots of armouries and troops, a prime example being Hull, which was a rich source of arms and also supplied an army of some 16,000 troops. ...read more.

Middle

Parliament went into the war with all the aforementioned advantages, however these were no substitute for the events that occurred during the war. Throughout the war both sides' armies stubbornly remained in their locality for fear of their homes being plundered, with one notable exception; in 1643 London's trained bands left their posts to help their counterparts further north. This was not a hugely significant factor but nevertheless it contributed to the Parliamentarian war effort. By late 1643 another dilemma had mutually occurred among the respective sides. This dilemma was a lack of troops. The natural step was to seek the help of the Scots, and both sides attempted to do so. The Scots however were opposed to the King after he had, a few years earlier, attempted to implement an Arminian prayer book into Scotland, this had led to war so the Scots sided with Parliament. This signified a huge setback to the Royalists and a great achievement for Parliament. ...read more.

Conclusion

This battle in 1644 signalled the end of the King's northern stronghold and was therefore a significant factor in Parliament's eventual success. A yet more decisive battle came in June 1645 on the grounds of Naseby. Here came the definite realisation of the Parliamentary victory to come when, the Royalist's last main field army was beaten by Cromwell, Fairfax and their many pawns. Then came the final major battle of the English Civil War; the battle of Longport- a mere formality for the Parliamentarians, its only significance derived from the perspective of hindsight when its finality is demonstrated. This was effectively the end of the war. The aforementioned battles laid the foundations for and signalled the end of The English Civil War and Parliament's consequent escalation to sole governors of England and her lands. In conclusion, it is not possible to state one reason or event that, beyond all others, was responsible for Parliament's victorious Civil War campaign. A whole plethora of factors were responsible for Parliament's feat and it was the amalgamation of these factors that led to their victory. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay


**
There are a number of factors responsible for Parliament's victory in the Civil War; Resources, Building Armies, Making Alliances, Political Struggles & Battles are the main ones. Each one deserves a paragraph explaining in what way it was a contributing factor with evidence to support the point. This answer is relatively brief - more of an overview which would lose marks due to lack of detail and supporting evidence. Examiners tend to award marks for a level of thinking and this is why it is important not to rewrite chunks of a textbook but to think, organise, select and then deploy evidence in order to persuasively argue a point. Strong focus on the question is paramount and links should be explicit not implicit. Overall, this answer has elements in it which answer the question but it is not sustained or developed. It would also benefit from better organisation and planning.

Marked by teacher Natalie Stanley 08/01/2013

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level British History: Monarchy & Politics essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To what extent was James I responsible for his financial problems?

    It needed to be updated. However much it needed to be updated, it was hard. This was shown by the attempted introduction of the great contract. It said that James would give up his feudal dues in return for �200,000 per annum of parliamentary taxation.

  2. Why did Parliament win the First Civil War?

    Politically, John Pym was very important until his death in 1643. He kept Parliament's war effort together and his leadership was vital to the Earl of Essex's survival in the war. He made sure that all of Parliament were for defeating the King and the Royalist forces as the were

  1. Charles V - An Evaluation Of Success And Failures.

    It could be argued that only small territorial changes occurred during the Hapsburg Valois wars, and both sides suffered heavy losses and financial problems, and this contributed to Philip's bankruptcy in 1557.

  2. Why did King Charles I Resort to Personal Rule in 1629?

    the individual's right to be consulted in Parliament before paying tax, and about the limits of Royal power. As the Forced Loan was very successful - the equivalent of five subsidies had been raised when Parliament would have only given four - the Members of Parliament became worried that the

  1. Henry VII and His Money.

    for it out of the ordinary sources of revenue available to him. Today people expect to pay taxes if they want the government to do things in the country, but in Tudor times the ordinary citizen, somewhat illogically we may feel, expected the King to "live of his own" and govern "of his own" as well.

  2. Why was The Great Reform Act passed in 1832 ?

    of �10 annual value, and the boundaries of the constituency were extended to include the whole parish rather than just the borough, so that 257 voters were now concerned and not just the burgesses, although still over half the householders of Horsham were ineligible to vote.

  1. Asses the most important factors that led to David Lloyd George(TM)s downfall in 1922

    This was especially true of LG's "homes fit for heroes" scheme, despite 170,000 new houses being built by 1922 the project was deemed a massive disappointment. In 1917 the Ministry of Reconstruction to look into the matter of substandard housing and it was concluded in 1919 that there were 400,000 houses across the country unfit for habitation.

  2. Constitutional Nationalism succeeded in achieving its aims whereas revolutionary nationalism failed and cultural nationalism ...

    Another of the successes of the Fenians was the spreading of their message through their newspaper, the Irish people. Also, according to Russell Rees "in many towns the Fenian movement played a prominent role in the organisation of a variety of social and recreational pastimes, and this aspect alone may have been sufficient to attract interested members."

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work