• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did Stalin, Rather than Trotsky, Emerge as Leader of the USSR by 1929?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Shai Manor History 12A IB 06/09/04 Why did Stalin, Rather than Trotsky, Emerge as Leader of the USSR by 1929? After Lenin's death the Bolsheviks were committed to selecting a new leader. The main contestants were Stalin and Trotsky. When Lenin was in the last stage of his life he came to see Stalin was not the "great Georgian" he always called him, but a fierce dictator who would change the USSR forever. In 1929 the Georgian forced his authority and took over the Bolshevik party. Stalin's personal characteristics and qualities helped him become leader of the party. One personal characteristic which the public liked was that he was of proletarian roots himself and therefore would not cause splits within the party. Terry Morris also suggests that: "He was blameless and uncomplicated." Some characteristics differing from the highly complex rivals. ...read more.

Middle

They where both members of the Politburo and had high ranked roles in the government. Stalin, being the General Secretary, appointed his supporters to key positions in the party. It is logical that if he could do that, he could also expel Trotsky's supporters. Furthermore, he would exchange those expelled with even more of his supporters. According to Robert D. Warth, Stalin had replaced 37 of the 50 party secretaries, which is more than half of them! Stalin was politically very skilful and cunning. Stalin had his own view of the New Economic Policy and decided to make Russia's industrialization grow more rapidly. This idea was supported by the greater part of party members. Socialism in one country was another thing that appealed the public; the party members did not want an everlasting revolution. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although Stalin was very powerful, Trotsky may be the reason for his own defeat. He had only joined the Bolshevik party in 1917; he was a Menshevik until then. Therefore he was not seen as a loyal party member. Furthermore, many Bolsheviks did not trust him and thought, since he had the army on his side, that he would try to become the dictator. Trotsky underestimated Stalin and therefore lost the power he could have had. He was seen as high-minded and arrogant, rude towards his colleagues and was seen as the person to make "splits within the party". Conclusion By the end of 1926 Trotsky was voted off the Politburo, and in October1927 he lost his place in the central committee. One month later he even got expelled from the Bolshevik party and was exiled in January of 1928 to Soviet Asia. Stalin then emerged as Lenin's full successor. Word count: 758 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Why did Stalin rather than Trotsky emerge as the leader of the Soviet Union ...

    He was politically skilful and very cunning, which is exemplified by his manipulation of Lenin's funeral from which he prevented Trotsky attending by purposely telling him the wrong date. Trotsky absence from the funeral portrayed him in a negative light for the rest of the population because it seemed as

  2. Why did Stalin rather than Trotsky emerge as the leader of the USSR in ...

    He was seen as the person most likely to cause splits in the party. Trotsky did not go out of his way to develop or build up his power base in the party and this allowe3d Stalin to erode the small one he already had.

  1. Lenin and the Bolshevik revolution.

    The army and the people should merely carry out the resolutions of the Soviet....The Soviet must convene the constituent assembly, which will settle on a new constitution and end the war. Here again, it is difficult to imagine the authors of these radical lines being able to make their peace with a moderate party.

  2. Why did Stalin, Rather than Trotsky emerge as leader of the USSR in 1929

    As this made other contenders want him to be on their side because he could deliver votes in the congress. However it was not only due to Stalin's politics and character that he emerged as leader, but to a man named Leon Trotsky he failed on many occasions to step up to the challenge as leader.

  1. Why did Stalin, rather than Trotsky, emerge as leader of USSR in 1929?

    If Trotsky would have become closer to the Bolshevik bureaucrats then he could have become more successful, as to them he was just an arrogant individualist whom they had nothing in common with. Trotsky did nothing to change their perspectives on him.

  2. Why did Stalin rather than Trotsky emerge as the leader of theUSSR in 1929?

    At the end of the 1920s he decided to go for rapid industrialisation and the majority of party members supported this. They supported Stalin in this because his policies matched what they had wanted throughout the debate. They felt that they could relate to him.

  1. Why did Stalin emerge as leader of Soviet Russia?

    Stalin clearly attacked Trotsky first as he knew that he was a strong contender for the position of leader of Soviet Russia, so by eradicating the support he may have once obtained, he strengthened his own chances of emerging as leader.

  2. The Impact of Stalins Leadership in the USSR, 1924 1941. Extensive notes

    This was a major cause of the 1927-8 procurement crisis. This crisis forced the regime into requisitioning (named Urals-Siberian method) and then into collectivisation. 2. Also some evidence that Stalin exaggerated the crisis in order to provide an excuse for tough action against the peasantry.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work