• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? The Second War was vastly different that the First World War, being fought on a much greater scale. An invasion of Britain was never contemplated in the First World War. The major development of the German air force, the Luftwaffe, created a major threat to Britain as increasing number of air bombing raids attacked its major cities. Invasion by the Axis powers was felt to be imminent. But there was a grim determination to resist at all costs. In September 1939, The British Government decided that their children, the next generation of Britain, should be evacuated. The children living in London and other major cities were immediately tagged like parcels and shipped out by special evacuation trains. Nearly 3,000,000 people, mainly children, were transported to places of safety in the countryside. ...read more.

Middle

They stood the risk of witnessing their parents being killed which would scar them mentally for the rest of their lives. These children would remember how their parents had suffered and would therefore be reluctant to fight in any future war The British Government therefore decided to evacuate children to the relative safety of the country. For victory to be accomplished in this war, it was crucial that everyone helped as part of the war effort. Women, having proven how hard they could work, and by displaying their motivation in the First World War, were heavily involved in the war effort as well as men. Many of these men and women had children who were dependant on them. The government decided that for the allies to be victorious, one hundred percent effort was needed. This would certainly be hindered if the fighting men and the women in the factories had to look over their shoulders and worry about their children all the time. ...read more.

Conclusion

Another reason for the British Governments policy of evacuation of children was censorship of what they wanted children to see. Evacuation was a perfect way to minimise the death rate and also, at the same time, shielding the children from the harsh realities of the war. One incidental outcome of the evacuation was that psychologists were able to study the effects of separation and loss on these children. This work on "attachment behavior" became respected world wide and is still used today in situations were children are separated from parents. The most famous study was by John Bowlby. The Government' plan of evacuating the children was seen as ideal, the children were safely deployed in a safe environment, while being sheltered from the horrors of the war and at the same time their parents were able to focus on the war effort. However, the Government took a huge gamble. They separated the children from the men and women on whom the effort depended. That would surely affect their morale and hinder the war effort. CHARLIE DEBELLE - 11.7 1 GCSE HISTORY COURSEWORK ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level International History, 1945-1991 essays

  1. In what ways did the Second World War affect the lives of ordinary people ...

    As time passed it became apparent that the Germans had under estimated the British and the advantage they had as the location was conveniently over British airspace. This meant the Germans had to travel long distances to reach targets and return quickly in order to refuel.

  2. The Prelude to the 1975 War and the Cairo Agreement.

    Hezbollah guerrillas hit the Israeli Merkava tank with a Sagger missile and killed an Israeli soldier and wounded three others in the Shebaa Farms area, where the borders of Lebanon, Syria and Israel meet. A special U.N. envoy said the next day that the rocket attack that killed an Israeli

  1. Post-Cold War Realities

    POST-COLD WAR REALITIES The worldwide ripple effects of the end of the Cold War have produced unprecedented voids and power vacuums that someone was bound to fill. The greater Middle East region, including the Caspian, Caucasus and Central Asia, has undoubtedly demonstrated the extremes to which these areas were once

  2. American History.

    The Continental Association [non-importation of British goods, non-consumption of British products and non-exportation of American goods to Britain] was implemented throughout late 1774 and early 1775. - To back them up the Continental Congress recommended that elected committees of observation and inspection be established throughout America.

  1. What Impact did the Second World War have on the lives of women in ...

    Even though the government new of the problems between the men and women in the workforce together in 1941 the government called up all single women between the ages of 20 and 30 and it was believed that a lot of them would soon be in anti-aircraft crews along with men.

  2. Why did hitler bomb british cities?

    Several other major attacks on Coventry took place, such as the one on November 14 1940. On this day, the Luftwaffe had pulled all the stops out. The raid was made by 515 German bombers, two thirds from Luftwaffe 3 and the rest from the pathfinders of Kampfgruppe 100.

  1. The Battle of Britain as a turning point in the Second World War.In the ...

    Sadly the British Navy had no ships that they could use at that time to rescue the stranded solders. The Government the asked anyone who had a vessel capable of sailing across the channel to help Britain in her 'hour of need' There was a massive response made up of

  2. How did World War II affect the lives of civilians in Wales and Britain?

    It is, I believe in cockney. It also shows poor grammar and speech qualities. Instead of saying that 'you can't have any more to eat', the child says 'you can't have no more to eat'. So, this is yet another source that shows up their poor education and lack of understanding.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work