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Why did the liberal government introduce social reforms 1906-1914?

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Introduction

Why did the liberal government introduce social reforms 1906-1914? There are multiple reasons why the Liberal government introduced acts of social reform between 1906 and 1914. The obvious reason is that there was a great need for reform(change) but there are also many other factors that played a part in the decision for a reform. This change was really required to help and improve Britain. The reason for this need for change was the poor conditions that all parts of Britain had been left in after the conservatives had been in power. It is often said that the Liberals had to introduce in social reforms due to pressure from the Labour party. This new party was formed in 1903 and had very little major union connections even though there policies were committed to reform Britain. ...read more.

Middle

Up to 50% of people had to be turned down. This made the liberals contemplate how Britain could battle successfully again countries such as America. Because of this there were committees set up to evaluate and analyze this to show that the physical condition males was very poor, as this was the group of people who would be defending Britain for years to come something needed to be done. If Britain would always struggle to defeat. The other factor that made the need seem realistically more desperate was from surveys carried out indifferent places by two very different men Seebohm Rowntree and Charles Booth. The carried surveys out on all classes but were very concerned about the poor. After many years of analyzing and evaluating they calculated that a family of fives minimum necessary income per week for a family to exist at' mere physical efficiency' was 21s 8d. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Liberals therefore had to introduce new reforms to help support their people. In 1906 there were many young and ambitious politicians who became part of the Liberal government. Two of the most important were David Lloyd George and Winston Churchill. Both of these men felt that the state of Britain's poor was a national disgrace. Lloyd George had big ideas about the reform after he visited Germany in 1908 and saw their welfare system In 1906 the Liberals decided that they needed to take action on the poverty of British people. The main reason being that the Liberals were faced with so much evidence of such terrible poverty, hardship and ill health and something had to be changed to bring Britain back to its strong Empire again. ...read more.

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4 star(s)

This is a good response that addresses the main explanations for the introduction of the reform programme and considers both internal and external factors. The conclusion could be improved upon. 4 out of 5 stars.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 20/08/2013

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