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Why did the Second Crusade Fail?

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Introduction

Why did the Second Crusade Fail? The Second Crusade was called on the 1st of December 1147 by Pope Eugenius III. Initially, it had been addressed to King Louis VII of France and his subjects. The main objective that had been announced was to reclaim Edessa as it was essential for the Franks to recapture this land. Unfortunately, the objective had not been achieved in the crusade; in fact the goal to recapture Edessa was a complete failure. However, although Edessa was the main objective of the Second Crusade, during the course of the crusade the Christians set their sights on Damascus, the Baltic and Iberia. These additional aims came about when they reached the Holy Land. Despite these new goals, the only true success of the Second Crusade was Iberia; all other aims failed (although the Baltic crusade was a success to a certain degree, but only for a short period). ...read more.

Middle

Now the question 'was the aim to recapture Damascus instead worth all the effort?' arises. The answer is simple; it was certainly not. Damascus leads me on to the next point of failure of the Second Crusade. Damascus was a great city which radiated the blossoming Arab race. It had been such a city that it motivated the crusaders through greed, which was most probably why the crusaders could not achieve the capture of such a city - because every crusader had their own goals in mind. This particular city had been too strong for the crusaders to take over, and since the crusaders were disunited by greed, and the such, it was only expected that they would fail to capture Damascus as well. The crusaders did have their chance to successfully capture the city, and that was to continue the seigure of the northern wall of the city, however, the crusading leaders had a fatal change of plan which drastically affected the outcome. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Second Crusade also had its long term effects. It created problems for the Catholic Church as it resisted any chance of Christianity establishing itself in Outr�-mere and the surrounding area. It had also created a huge loss in confidence among the Christians after such a humiliating defeat. The defeat had caused so much pain for the Christians that many believed that God was no longer on their side and so many Christians lost their faith. In conclusion, to a very large degree, the Second Crusade was a failure. Edessa, the main reason behind the crusade was lost and they failed to reclaim it. Damascus was, frankly, a waste of time (due to their careless tactics which were not well thought out) and finally the success of the Baltic was only for a short period. Iberia was the main success of the Second Crusade and even that is not worthy of mention as it was not even planned from the beginning of the Crusade. The Second Crusade proved to be a disaster and caused a lot of pain for many Christians. ...read more.

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