• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why were the major cities of Britain bombed by the Germans in 1940-1941?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Question 1 Why were the major cities of Britain bombed by the Germans in 1940-1941? There are quite a few reasons as to why the major cities of Britain such as London, Coventry, Plymouth and even Manchester and Glasgow were bombed by the Germans in 1940 to 1941. Although for Britain the Second World War began on the 3rd September 1939 it did not really begin until 1940. Thus from 1939 to 1940 became a period known as the "Phoney War". The bombing of the major cities was known as the Blitz, the German word for lightening, and one of the reasons why Hitler decided to bomb Britain was because he had given up his attempt to invade Britain in September 1940. Before Hitler had decided to bomb the major cities of Britain he had attacked the RAF by using the Luftwaffe. Three German planes were shot down for every one British plane, but by the end of August things were beginning to change. ...read more.

Middle

Also Hitler believed he could use similar tactics against Britain. Another major reason for the Blitz was more to do with the people of Britain. It was hoped that the bombing of major British cities would break the morale of British people if they saw their homes being destroyed and the people closest to them being killed. Hitler hoped and believed that by braking people's morale, the people of Britain would then force the British government to surrender to the Germans. Hitler also bombed the major cities of Britain in an attempt to destroy industry. The London Docks were attacked regularly too. The German airforce, the Luftwaffe, also tried to bomb gas-holders, power stations, railway lines and junctions. These were the things that were of importance to the British people, which they needed, in their daily lives. Other major cities such as Coventry, Plymouth and Liverpool were bombed as some were major industrial areas e.g. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also, most British fighters were unable to fly at night, so the Germans were virtually unopposed and were able to do what they wanted to do. As you can see there are quite a few reasons as to why the Germans bombed the major cities of Britain, but the reasons all lead to the same conclusion. The conclusion being that Hitler hoped to gain control over Britain by forcing the British government to surrender. He hoped to do this mainly by bringing down their morale and industry. In this way Hitler would control most of Western Europe which is what he wanted to do. Hitler's main interest was in the East though. Hitler knew he could not invade Britain as Germany did not have the ships available to carry troops over the English Channel and so Hitler hoped that by bombing the major British cities he could force Britain into surrendering. In that way he could control the west of Europe and there would be no one to stop him take control of East. Michelle Chasey ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. Hitler's Willing Executioners - The role of Ordinary Germans during the Holocaust

    This meant that the members of the battalion had no choice but to take part in the executions. However, in police battalion force 101 this was not the case. Before a mass killing would take place those in charge of their squads would tell their men that those who do not wish to kill are excused.

  2. Russia 1905 - 1941

    The second of these plans focused on improving the transport and the production of machinery. The third and final 5 year plan was launched in 1938. This plan concentrated on the production of household goods such as radios bicycles and other such luxuries.

  1. The Battle of Britain

    On April 3rd1939 Hitler issued a top secret directive for the instigation of 'Case White' to proceed. The German military forces now prepared themselves for a major assault on Poland. Hitler knew the position very well. He now had a military force that had been superbly trained.

  2. Assess the relative importance of the reasons why the July 1944 Bomb Plot to ...

    Despite this, the coup still had potential for success but this chance diminished the moment Olbricht chose to delay the orders for Operation Valkryie. Had the conspirators been prepared for Hitler's survival and organised plans in order to ensure the coup in Berlin succeeded they may have been successful.

  1. Why were the major cities of Britain bombed by the Germans in 1940-1941?

    Instead of this, Hitler turned to his experience of bombing and the thought of how much more catastrophic it would be. The bombing of Guernica, in the Basque Country, Spain, was lead by the Germans, on 10 April, 1937.

  2. Why were the major cities of Britain bombed by the Germansin 1940-1941?

    Rather than attack solely the RAF bases, they would raid residential areas thus increasing their range of targets. He also decided on night time bombing so that his aircraft would be under the cover of night and have less chance of being shot down thus improving the safety of his pilots.

  1. Why Were The Major Cities of Britain Bombed by the Germans in 1940-41?

    those far away from industrial centres, would be safe from the German terror bombing. Finally, as revenge for the British bombing of the German capital Berlin. Goering had boasted early in the war that Berlin could never be bombed. Britain, seizing the opportunity, carried out a small bombing raid on

  2. The Impact of Stalins Leadership in the USSR, 1924 1941. Extensive notes

    Living standards in the 1930s: 1. The Great Famine (1932-3) caused many deaths, along with major problems in towns as they were swamped with refugees from the countryside and the rationing system often broke down. 2. There was a housing shortage and many families were crammed into communal apartments. 3.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work