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Within the context of the years 1871 -1990, to what extent was Hitler the most authoritarian German leader?

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Introduction

´╗┐Anisha Patel Within the context of the years 1871 -1990, to what extent was Hitler the most authoritarian German leader? During the years 1871-1990 Germany had been through two substantial wars leaving Germany in turmoil resulting in the German people losing faith in their democratic state resulting in a range of leaders governing Germany. In this time Germany had been governed by several leaders including Bismarck, Kaiser Wilhelm II and the most renown of them all; Adolf Hitler. The citizens of Germany had been through democracy with Wilhelm as well as the Weimar republic which had evidently been a failure resulting in dictatorship under the leadership of Hitler. Kaiser was held responsible for the outbreak of World war One as well as Germany being humiliated in the terms of the Treaty of Versailles and leaving Germany?s reputation questionable as a great power. However Bismarck, also known as the ?Iron Chancellor? was successful in forming the unification of Germany out of a collection of independent and self governing German states under Germany. Hitler was indisputably the most authoritarian of them all as he implemented policies such as his foreign policy and his economic policy which reduced the number of people who were unemployed in Germany. ...read more.

Middle

Hitler produced posters that showed democracy was failing under the rule of the Kaiser and democracy so posters with messages such as ?Hitler; our last hope? were published. This showed the order and discipline amongst the Nazis which Germany had lacked under the Kaiser and the Weimar Government, showing people that Germany could be a much stronger country under Hitler and the Nazis. It is almost another way of saying that they need to turn to Hitler as a last resort, it also showed Hitler as a messianic figure who people could turn to in times of turmoil unlike the Weimar republic and the Kaiser. Many people were attracted to Hitler because he was extremely passionate in his beliefs and people could see that he was determined to improve the lives of the German people and subsequently improve Germany. The support for Hitler increased as the German people began to witness his gift of talking when he was seen speaking to the public. Especially at the Nuremburg rallies where there were masses of people engaged in Hitler?s speeches, Hitler managed to work the audience into a frenzy with his words full of passion, creating an eccentric atmosphere. ...read more.

Conclusion

however, still not enough to get an overall majority to pass laws. However, Hitler succeeded in getting a majority through the enabling Act as he used the SA army to intimidate the opposition such as the Social Democrats. Hitler achieved this in the 1930s by not allowing Communists to vote and by using the SA men to threaten MPs. The Reichstag was assembled under threatening circumstances where the SA men were swarming inside and outside the chamber to ensure communists did not disrupt Hitler’s speech. This is an example of where Hitler at an early stage exercises his authoritarian leadership even though he is not yet dictator which shows the confidence he had in his leadership. He used terror and intimidation to get the results that he wanted which in this case was to get rid of democracy once and for all in order to introduce the German people to a totalitarian state. Through the act Hitler had gained legislative powers to the government as a whole, for all intents exercised by Hitler himself as Goebbels states, “The authority of the Fuhrer has now been wholly established. Votes are no longer taken. The Führer decides.” ...read more.

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