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'Without the work of women on the home front, Britain should not have won the first world war' Use the sources and your own knowledge to explain whether you agree with this view.

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Introduction

Katherine Dickinson 'Without the work of women on the home front, Britain should not have won the first world war' Use the sources and your own knowledge to explain whether you agree with this view. When war broke out in 1914, most people in Britain expected that it would be over in a matter of months. Accordingly to the slogan of the government, it was 'business as usual'. Only gradually did the full horror begin when to dawn, and with, the mobilization of the nation to win the war at all costs. One of these was to allow women to replace mens' places at work. This was not very popular with the men, but with the women it was. Source A, a letter written in 1976 by a woman who lived and worked through the First World War, explains why. In the source she writes how there was a pay increase from �2 a month to �5 a week. This was obviously popular with the women as they can now afford to buy the essentials that themselves and their family needed. She also tells of how her working hours were cut from 6am to 9pm to working just 12 hours a day. This is also popular with the women because they were working less hours a day for more pay. ...read more.

Middle

In the photograph, women work on and in the background there is a blackboard with a message on it. The message reads 'when the boys come back we are not going to keep you any longer- girls'. This shows that women, in some eyes, were not needed to help win the war. This source is very reliable as it is reality. However if the girls had not of been working in that factory Britain would have lost the war because they would of ran out of munition. Source E is propaganda. It is a poster published by the British government in 1916. It was to encourage young women to working munitions factories. The picture is of a soldier walking out of a door as the women is putting on her overalls as if she was going to work. There is a message which say's 'These women are doing their bit'. I don't think that this source is very reliable as it is propaganda published by the British government. It is not reality; it is a message to play on womens' minds and make them feel guilty if they do not work. However this worked and if it had not then fewer men would have been able to fight the war as they would have had to stay behind to work. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, I do not agree with the source as the 'man' probably did not see the reason why there was women working everywhere. They were just helping Britain to win the war by filling in for the men as they fought the war. Source J is a painting 'for king and country' by E.F Skinner, 1917. The painting shows women working very hard in dresses. I think that the source is not very reliable as the women would probably not wear dresses to work in a factory. However the name of the painting, 'for king and country', suggests that the painter also thought that the women were paying a vital role in helping Britain to win the war. From my point of view, 'Without the work of women on the home front, Britain could not have won the First World War'. I agree with this statement, as do several of the sources, because who could have kept the munitions factories going to keep producing the munition for the men at war? Who could of tried to keep routine things such as buses and trains e.c.t to running as smooth as clockwork? Some men may not agree with this statement because they do not see it through a womens point of view, but if women had not of been able to work Britain would probably not be an independent country today because there would have been a shortage in everything including soldiers, workers, munition e.c.t. ...read more.

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