• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

World war two - What measures were taken to resist invasion.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What Measures Were Taken to Resist Invasion In 1939, Hitler attacked Norway and Denmark using the method of Blitzkrieg. He then moved on to take Holland, Belgium and France. By June 22nd he had total power of Western Europe. Britain knew that attack was inevitable and therefore needed to prepare against the might of the German Blitzkrieg. In 1940, Britain's armed forces were in a bad state and there were little or no preparations to resist against invasion. At the embarrassing defeat of Dunkirk, Britain had lost 300,000 men, nearly all of their tanks and military vehicles and over half of the R.A.F. Britain was in no state to fight the mighty, efficient and unstoppable Blitzkrieg. ...read more.

Middle

Their purpose was to stop the invasion but really ended up building bomb shelters and reassuring the public. Unlike the Homeguard, Churchill took the status of beach defences very seriously as this was the Germans most likely point of invasion. All manner of obstacles were placed to block them; concrete blocks, barbed wire and pillboxes to shoot down advancing German soldiers. Many other objects were placed to stop the Germans such as tanktraps, iron drums and make shift roadblocks. To stop the risk of gliders landing on the roads, iron hoops were situated along major roads to rip off the wings of the landing gliders. There was also the matter of internal security. ...read more.

Conclusion

This propaganda bombardment was vitally important to Britain and without it, morale would have plummeted. In the end Hitler called off the invasion, but why was this? It is not very likely that Hitler pulled on the leashes of Blitzkrieg just because of the homeguard and Britain's pitiful defences, instead it is a lot more likely that when Hitler lost the Battle of Britain, it was a major blow to him as he was relying on his air attacks to conquer Britain so that his main body of men could concentrate on the formidably numbered Russia. So no the defences did not very likely turn Hitler away from Britain but instead it was the R.A.F. and the fact that Germany had bigger fish to fry in the form of Russia. Ben Bowden 11C ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Modern European History, 1789-1945 essays

  1. The Battle of Britain

    Some of the ships/boats were in a grim state, they went okay, but many were worse the wear for a coat of paint, but if they were seaworthy irrespective as to what they looked like, then they were commandeered for the task.

  2. How realistic are POW films?

    They appeared to be reasonably hygienic and were even referred to as 'holiday camps' I know this is unrealistic because if prisoners were in such a bad condition then their camps can't have been clean. Also many sources describe the camps as 'unclean' and 'disease ridden' source A1 describes how

  1. To What Extent did Commandos contribute to final victory in World War Two

    However even though Commandos were utilised (successfully carrying out their missions), the bulk of the assault was led by Canadian forces. The aim of this operation was, however, different in that it was not a raid but more a reconnaissance in force; a way of trying out large scale amphibious assault to capture a defended European port intact.

  2. A Night to remember - Invincible. That was the sole word in the English ...

    Little did I know how overconfident and how much ill-founded faith in ourselves I had. The day finally came in mid-November when the Admiralty in London finally gave us the message we had been waiting for.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work