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Barriers to Effective Communication Communication is the process of sending and receiving messages between two or more people; this is something that we do all the time. It is important that nurses recognise that communication is the key to good holis...

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Introduction

Barriers to Effective Communication Communication is the process of sending and receiving messages between two or more people; this is something that we do all the time. It is important that nurses recognise that communication is the key to good holistic care, as patients need reassurance and information regarding their care. Communication is so much more than just talking to one another. It is how people respond to each other in many different ways (Langs 1983). Some examples of communication are talking, writing, signing, reading and body language, which is suggested, has several elements (Dimbleby and Burton 1992). Communication can be very effective but first it needs to be established, and then maintained. Nurses can do this during an assessment when a patient/client comes into hospital. However, it is argued that barriers to communication can prevent appropriate and effective care being given to patients. Communication can either facilitate the development of a therapeutic relationship or create barriers (Stuart and Sundeen 1995). Because of their diverse nature, communication disorders are difficult to classify (Crystal, 1980). You can discover problems simply by observing an individual. Observation can be used to establish which language is being used, if the client has any hearing difficulties or visual impairments, physical illness or disability, or if there are learning difficulties. ...read more.

Middle

The pre lingual deaf person has no knowledge of sound. Although the vocal cords can function properly, they have no idea how to use them or what the end result is supposed to be. It is much easier for them to reproduce a sound by imitating it then it is for them to use other means such as diagrams or written descriptions. Therefore, when we describe someone as being deaf and dumb we do not mean dumb in the true sense of the word (Syder 1992). The speech of a deaf person is determined from being very intelligible to unintelligible depending on the degree of hearing impairment. Most people with relatively minor loss can be reassured that their speech will remain normal (Martin and Grover 1986). The problems that a deaf person has is that they cannot differentiate between vowels, omission and distortion of consonants, they have an incorrect stress pattern, strained and breathy voice quality, they usually have a pitch which is too high or too low and volume which is mismatched with the context of the conversation. Teenage boys often need help with the pitch of their voice to allow it to drop at the right time (Syder 1992). The post lingual deaf person's speech will eventually deteriorate. ...read more.

Conclusion

I am going to assess the patient/client and look that little deeper to make sure that it is not just the physical barriers that I am alerted to, but that I am also aware of the associated psychological barriers that a patient/client might have. As nurses we should all improve our knowledge based core skills as well as are practical core skills and be aware of difficulties and barriers that a patient might have. By being aware of these barriers it will enable us to assess the patient in a way that will benefit their care and also enable us as nurses to plan a suitable care package taking into consideration their barriers and difficulties. Reference List Ellis, R.B. Gates, R.J. Kenworthy, N. 1995. Interpersonal Communication in Nursing. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Lewycka, M. 2001.Caring For Someone With A Hearing Loss. London: Age Concern Martin, M. Grover, B. 1986. Hearing Loss. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone McMillan, M. Townsend, J. 1994 Reflections on Contemporary Nursing Practice. Australia: Reed International Books. McQuail, D. 1984. Communication. 2nd Edition. United States of America: Longman Inc. Nolan, Y. 2001. NVQ Level 3 In Care. Oxford: Heinemann. Peplau, H.E. 1988. Interpersonal Relations in Nursing. Hampshire: Macmillan Education Ltd. Riley, J.B. 2000 Communication in Nursing. 4th Edition. United States of America: Mosby Inc. Syder, D. 1992. An Introduction to Communication Disorders. London: Chapman and Hall. Judith Tidbury Page1 ...read more.

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