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Computer Aided Learning (CAL): What are the issues?

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Introduction

Title Computer Aided Learning (CAL): What are the issues? Done By Sharif Sharif A. Presentation of the Issue The applications of computers are growing rapidly, and expectations of this technology are growing at the same rate. One of the newest branches of computer application is Computer Aided Learning or CAL. Although computers and educational packages are generally in use today, Computer Aided Learning in the future will be even more essential and important. Today computers are used as a big, fast encyclopedia or data book, a tape recorder, type writer or video, but in the future CAL systems will contain smart adaptive trainers that will adapt themselves to learners' features and propose the best method of teaching. Again, we will have more remote learning and video conferencing instead of today's traditional classes. CAL now is a new idea, but as time goes by, it will become very important and wide-spread. B. The IT Background of the Issue In this part we shall look at the various types of CALL and where they might be employed in a typical lesson, turn to look at the major types of CALL software and how they might best be used in the class. Most class lessons in language learning follow a pattern on the lines of: 1. ...read more.

Middle

* encourages exploration: as students do not feel "observed" by a teacher they tend to be more willing to take risks, make mistakes and learn more freely. Disadvantages * no understanding: most CAL systems do not understand the subject they are teaching and can not explain the material to students having problems. * inflexible teaching: the teaching strategy is generally fixed and the does not have much ability to offer alternative examples or change its teaching approach - many systems embody a form of rote learning. * preparation: much time needs to be invested in the development of CAL for it to be effective (anywhere from 200 hours to 800 hours development time is quoted by developers to produce 1 hour of student learning time) * un-editable content: few CAL systems provide tools for teachers to easily change content (e.g., change text fragments, audio clips, exercises and answers) which means that most packages can only be used once with any group of learners. D. Solution to the Problems Arising from the Issue During the 70's, CAL systems were developed but the development rate was still low, because of some technical and also economical limitations, especially concerning hardware that was still expensive, massive and mainly without adequate sound and graphic facilities. ...read more.

Conclusion

Foundations of intelligent tutoring systems: An introduction. In M. Polson and J. Richardson (ed) Intelligent Tutoring Systems: An Introduction. Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associated Publication * De Boulay B. and Mizogouchi R. (1997). Artificial Intelligence in Education. Amsterdam : IOS Press * Everingham B. T. , Thomas B. T. , Troscianko T. and Easty D. (1998). Neural network virtual reality mobility aid for the severely visually impaired. Proceedings of the 2nd European Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and associated Technologies. Reading: The University of Reading. pp 183-192 * Frye C. H. (1969). CAI languages: Their capabilities and applications. In R. Atkinson and H. A. Wilson (ed) Computer Assisted Instruction. New York: Academic Press. * Gillian J. (1975). Computer assisted learning in ICL. In R. Hooper and I. Toye, (ed) Computer Assisted Learning in the United kingdom. London: Council for Educational Technology. * Hooper R. and Toye I. (1975). Computer Assisted Learning in the United Kingdom. London: Council for Educational Technology * Polson M. C. and Richardson J. J. (1988). Intelligent Tutoring System. Hillsdale : Lawrence Erlbaum Associated Publication * Nakabayashi K. , Maruyama M. , Koike Y. , Kato Y. , Touhei H. and Fukuhara Y. (1997). Architecture of an intelligent tutoring system on the WWW. In B. De Boulay and R. Mizoguchi (ed) Artificial Intelligence in Education. Amsterdam: IOS Press * Oblinger D. G. and Rush S. C. (1997). The Learning Revolution: The Challenge of Information Technology in the Academies. Bolto: Anker Publishing 1 ...read more.

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