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Advice to Jury Members.

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Introduction

´╗┐By Rickardo Mckenzie JURYS DO?S AND DON?T?S CRITERIA CHECKLIST: DO?S DON?T?S REASONS EVALUATION 1. Base your decisions on facts only. 1. discuss case work outside the courts and be influenced by negativity. 1. Because what is said in the Jury room has to stay in the jury room. 1. This helps the decision to be fair and non-biased giving resulting in a fair trial. however If information on the case leaves the Jury room it could influence a jury?s ability to make a non-biased decision based on the second hand information the Jury wrongly acquire. 1. ...read more.

Middle

1. Because as a Jury you are expected to give verdict on your own facts gathered and from what you have witnessed. Jury make the final decision so don?t let your views become influenced by the Judges personal views. 1. Taking notes during the trail allow the juror to go back and check his facts properly rather than relying on knowledge because if the trail is based over weeks or months it could be hard to remember vital information from memory. ...read more.

Conclusion

1. Being on time is essential for a juror as they need to be there before any court proceedings may continue. A Juror may be fined for contempt of court for being late without good cause. Being late can cause many problems for the courts as a Juror can be the reason for the court to be adjourned. 1. Keep views to yourself and only rely on the facts from the case. 1. research anything about the case online or from any other source 1. Doing personal research on the case using outside information allows a juror to gain a biased view on a case. 1. ...read more.

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