• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Assess the problems that arise through terminating and offer

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Assess the problems that arise through terminating and offer There are six different ways in which an offer can be terminated, these method are, Acceptance, Rejection, Revocation, Lapse of time, Failure to comply with conditions and Death. Alongside these ways of terminating an offer come problems. The problems that can arise with some of these methods including counter offers being made, revocation of a unilateral offer and the postal rule can cause problems for acceptance and revocation. A counter offer is an offer which has been made in response to a previous offer made by the offeree to the offeror, usually during negotiations when putting together the final contract. By making a counter offer the first offer that was given now becomes void and the counter offer must now be accepted or rejected for it to be recognised as part of the contract. If the original offer has been rejected and another offer put forward in its place is also rejected then the original offer cannot then be accepted, there is no way of going back to the original offer as seen in Hyde v Wrench (1840) in which Wrench had offered to sell Hyde his farm for £1,000, but Hyde rejected this by making a counter-offer and saying he would pay £950. ...read more.

Middle

Byrne later received Tienhoven?s revocation, but by then it was too late because the acceptance had been sent before the letter of revocation and under the postal rule this meant that the letter of revocation was invalid as the acceptance letter was posted in advance of the revocation. This case shows how important communication and timings are. However in this case the offer could have been revoked by a third party as long as they were reliable, as in the case of Dickinson v Dodds (1876). The problem with a third party member revoking an offer is that they must be reliable in the eyes of both parties because any little detail that is wrong could create a huge mess. In the case of Errington v Errington & Woods (1952) the offer is being revoked whilst that offeree has already started to perform the offer. A father had brought a house for this son and he said that if they paid off the remaining mortgage debts they could have the house, they accepted this by paying the debts, however the father died before the offer was complete and other members of the family wanted the house so they tried to revoke the fathers offer but they could not because it was already half way completed and as long as the son managed to pay the debt off the house would be his. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is seen in Household Fire Insurance v Grant (1879) in which Grant had no idea that he had become a shareholder in the company because he never received his letter of acceptance as it had been lost in the post, so when that company went into liquidation grant was liable for some of that company yet he was unaware that he was. The courts said that it does not matter that he was unaware of the acceptance, but he was essentially a shareholder when that letter was posted to him. There are also flaws with modern methods of communication for example with telephones if nobody answers the phone and you leave a message it is your duty to find out if that person has received the message as you are the one wanting to make to contract, because if they do not receive that message they are not bound by anything, Lord Denning gave an example of this in Entores Ltd v Miles Far East Corporation (1955) by saying ?If a man shouts an offer to a man across a river but the reply is not heard because of a plane flying overhead, there is no contract. If he wishes to make a contract he must wait till the aircraft has passed and then shout back his acceptance so that the offeror can hear it.? : ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Law of Contract section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Law of Contract essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Contract Law - Offer And Acceptance

    3 star(s)

    unilateral contract, in addition there is no further bargaining4 * However for bilateral contract, it is not offer as there is further bargaining of assuring himself that the other party is able to perform his part of the contract5 * Advertisement for auction6, advertisement for scholarship exam7, circulation of price-list

  2. e-commerce legal issues

    As traditional contract law is applied in online contracts, thus the display of goods with a price by sellers on eBay are merely an invitation to treat6 so that to attract consumers who are interested in these goods to make an offer to buy through bidding the goods.

  1. Contract Law - offer and acceptance.

    If the analogy of The Brimmes 1975 case is used to then the tender submitted by Mintex would have become effective at 6 p.m. on the 9th of September, if this was normal business hours for Astonia, if not the tender would have become effective at the start of business the next day.

  2. Four ways in which a contract may be discharged.

    The innocent party must take any reasonable steps that are available to mitigate the extent of the damage caused by the breach. Payzu v Saunders [1919] 2 KB 581. The contract was to deliver goods by instalments, payment to be made within one month of delivery.

  1. LAW OF CONTRACT. LAW 103. THE CONTENT OF THE CONTRACT.

    Megaw LJ: "I reach that conclusion for four reasons. First it tends towards certainty in the law. At any rate in commercial law there are obvious and substantial advantages in having, where possible, a firm and definite rule for a particular class of legal relationship.

  2. Dealing with problems of offer and acceptance.

    Grainger & Son v Gough (1896)5 . In effect, adverts would be offers to the entire world, as established in the case of Carlii v The Carbolic Smokeball Co. Ltd (1893)6, which would lead to potentially unlimited contractual liability. It is submitted in the age of the Internet, such an interpretation is even more important.

  1. Contract Practice for Alpha construction LTD.

    Agenda Items Item No. Details of issues to be discussed/objectives of discussions To be led by 1.0 Minutes of last meeting To agree the minutes of the meeting 21 February 2004 as an accurate record. (Minutes were circulated 25 February 2004) CB 2.0 Matters arising To discuss any matters arising from the minutes.

  2. DIFFEERENT AREAS OF CONTRACT LAW

    the company he would not seek employment with any business rival of his employer anywhere in the world for a period of two years. Dickenson left his employment and in breach of his contract restriction accepted the offer of employment with Levi Strauss & Co also involved in the global business manufacturing of denim jeans.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work