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Consecutive Governments have sort to bring about Frank Dobson's vision for equality, diversity and rights in an early years setting through passing laws about peoples rights. For example children's act 1989.

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Introduction

Task A Equality, Diversity and Rights Consecutive Governments have sort to bring about Frank Dobson's vision for equality, diversity and rights in an early years setting through passing laws about peoples rights. For example children's act 1989. The children's act 1989 is a far reaching legislation affecting children and their rights. Some of the points of this act are: * the well being of the child is paramount * parental responsibility stressed * partnership with parents * services designed to meet the need of individual families * children's own feelings taken into account * parents and extended families continue to play a role in child's life even when child lives away from home This act has promoted the rights of children and how they should be treated the same as adults in many ways and should be looked after properly. ...read more.

Middle

This act protects individuals from sex discrimination when: * applying for a job * at work * renting a home * house sale and purchase * in education * using goods and services men and women entitles to fair and equal treatment is what this act is about and this act isn't just for in education this act also covers men and women outside of education when they have left education. Also there was another acted which followed which was 'Equal pay act 1972' which stated that wages should be same for a particular job regardless of whether it is a man or a women worker. This act had promoted the right for equality, diversity and rights in an early years setting by promoting that women and men should be treated ...read more.

Conclusion

is to follow the following: School action level At this level, the school will make plans to meet the child's needs and the SENCO will draw up individual education plans in association with class teachers, parents and other professionals. The implementation of the individual education plan is the responsibility of the class teacher, although advice can be gained from the SENCO. School action plus level At this level, schools will seek the assistance of external support and involvement. An educational psychologist may assist in drawing up individual plans, although any involvement of external support will require the consent of parents. Statutory assessment When a school is still concerned that the child is not making adequate progress, they may seek a statutory assessment from the local education authority. ?? ?? ?? ?? Sophie Feaster Equality, diversity and rights Jenny Featherstone ...read more.

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