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Describe both the qualifications required for juries and the procedure for selecting a jury.

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Introduction

Describe both the qualifications required for juries and the procedure for selecting a jury? The basic qualifications required for jury service are laid down in the Jury's Act 1974. People are chosen from an electoral register at random by a computer. To qualify for jury service a person must be aged between 18 and 70. They must also have been a resident in the UK for at least 5 years since their 13th birthday. The person must be a British citizen. Everyone must take part of a jury service unless disqualified or excused. ...read more.

Middle

The Juries Act 1974 was amended by the Criminal Justice Act 2003 allows categories of people which used to be excluded able to serve on a jury. This included members of the judiciary and people involved in the administration or justice or the armed forces, the medical professions and MPs. Under the discretionary excusals, people with problems can asked to be excused or for their jury service to be deterred for reasons such as; being ill, suffering a disability, being a mother with a small child, business appointments, examinations and holiday which are already booked. ...read more.

Conclusion

15 jurors are selected at random from the pool and allocated to a court. A panel of 12 jurors are chosen randomly by the court clerk. The defence may challenge to the array, this is to challenge the whole jury on the basis it is unrepresentative or biased. They could also challenge for cause, this is to challenge the right of an individual juror to sit on the jury. The prosecution can also use these to challenge and also prosecution right to stand by jurors, which is a juror goes to the bottom of the potential jurors on the case and so will not be used unless there are not enough jurors. ?? ?? ?? ?? Fozia ...read more.

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Summary - an accurate account of the qualification and selection of juries. This should score well in an exam, when limited time would be available.
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Marked by teacher Nick Price 01/05/2013

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