AS and A Level: Sources of Law

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407 AS and A Level Sources of Law essays

  • Marked by Teachers essays 19
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  1. Marked by a teacher

    Common Law and Equity

    5 star(s)

    Summary: An excellent historical outline of the development of common law and equity, showing how equity is still relevant today.
    Rating: *****…

    • Essay length: 2536 words
    • Submitted: 17/04/2010
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 06/06/2013
  2. Marked by a teacher

    Three forms of Delegated Legislation and Control over it.

    4 star(s)

    Summary: Neither piece sets out a specific question. However both parts accurately described delegated legislation and controls over it. Both parts could be improved by use of examples and/or case…

    • Essay length: 948 words
    • Submitted: 04/12/2011
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 05/07/2013
  3. Marked by a teacher

    There are four main ways, for judges to interpret Parliamentary legislation; they can use the literal rule, golden rule, mischief rule, or the purposive approach.

    4 star(s)

    A good answer, especially for the literal, golden and mischief rules, all of which are well illustrated with relevant cases. The purposive approach is somewhat briefer and does not have…

    • Essay length: 962 words
    • Submitted: 12/11/2010
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 22/03/2012
  4. Marked by a teacher

    AS LAW -JUDICIAL PRECEDENT

    4 star(s)

    Summary
    This is a generally accurate outline of the system of judicial precedent and discusses some of the ways the courts can avoid a binding precedent. The question set does…

    • Essay length: 2295 words
    • Submitted: 29/11/2009
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 06/06/2013
  5. Marked by a teacher

    Jury (Criminal & Civil Trials)

    4 star(s)

    Summary:
    This is a generally accurate description of the role of juries. It could be improved by covering material in sequence - selection followed by trial and then consideration of…

    • Essay length: 1464 words
    • Submitted: 16/10/2009
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 06/06/2013
  6. Marked by a teacher

    the english legal system unit1 assignment4

    4 star(s)

    Summary
    Two contrasting pieces here: the first about the legal professions is perhaps a little outdated as the solicitors' and barristers' professions have found there is room to practise…

    • Essay length: 2587 words
    • Submitted: 28/07/2008
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 06/06/2013
  7. Marked by a teacher

    Advantages and Disadvantages of Purposive Approach

    3 star(s)

    This is a brief discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the purposive approach. Some of the points made could be expanded upon to fully make the point. This has…

    • Essay length: 462 words
    • Submitted: 02/01/2013
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 06/06/2013
    • Awarding body: OCR (for A-levels)
  8. Marked by a teacher

    Describe the law making procedure in Parliament.

    3 star(s)

    Summary
    A generally accurate description of the law-making procedure in the House of Commons. More should have been made of the procedure in the Lords and of the 'ping-pong' negotiations…

    • Essay length: 966 words
    • Submitted: 02/10/2012
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 06/06/2013
    • Awarding body: AQA (for A-levels)
  9. Marked by a teacher

    Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the mischief rule

    3 star(s)

    Two valid advantage points made but only one valid point as a disadvantage. It is good to see that each valid point is supported by a case illustration.
    Rating ***…

    • Essay length: 531 words
    • Submitted: 31/01/2012
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 18/03/2012
  10. Marked by a teacher

    Briefly explain what is meant by the doctrine of judicial precedent.

    3 star(s)

    This is a generally accurate answer, which at times contains some case authority and examples in support of the basic description. It is important to just answer the set question…

    • Essay length: 857 words
    • Submitted: 11/08/2011
    • Marked by teacher: (?) Nick Price 14/03/2012

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Assess the impact of the European Convention on Human Rights on UK law.

    "In conclusion, the lack of a Bill of Rights, as discussed above, leaves British citizens in a very uncomfortable position. By incorporating the European Convention on Human Rights into domestic law through the Human Rights Act and not entrenching the Convention with a proper Bill of Rights, has enabled the executive to maintain the concept of parliamentary sovereignty. By doing so the executive has provided itself with several 'get-out-clauses' so that citizens rights may not be properly protected as the executive can itself remove certain rights as it sees fit. A good example of this is the situation at present where the government wishes to remove suspected terrorists right not to be detained without a fair trial. By entrenching the Convention UK citizens would have their rights protected and only through special procedures could parliament change such rights. Until this happens I do not believe that there will be a satisfactory situation within the UK, with regard to civil liberties. This essay comprehensively covers the factual areas of the implementation of the European Convention on Human Rights and also covers various opinions regarding the possible impact of the implementation of the European Convention on Human Rights on UK law and UK citizens."

  • "While an unwritten constitution has the merit of flexibility, this flexibility is purchased at the expense of individual rights." - Discuss

    "In conclusion, while it may be argued that many of the traditional means of curbing government power and parliamentary sovereignty may seem ineffective in a flexible form of constitution like the UK, the Human Rights Act and the EC Act will likely constitute a new and powerful guarantee against an oppressive form of government where flexibility is "purchased" at the expense of individual rights. The objects to the un-entrenched British Constitution will however be practically evident only with a new constitution."

  • To what extent was a modern welfare state created by the liberals in 1906-14?

    "In conclusion, I would say that they did not create the modern welfare state, but instead, laid strong foundations for it. It I clear, however, that without the changes that were made by these Liberals, a welfare state might never have been created. This leads me to the deduction that the Liberals partially helped to create the modern welfare state. The most important step in my opinion was stage number four. I think this, as it was the first point where the Liberals invented something completely new and different. Although step five may have been seen as more radical and may have led to more changes it would have never arisen without stage four. History Vicky Maberley LVI 27th January 2003 page 1"

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