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Application of number: level 3 - Is House Buying a Good Idea or Not?

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Introduction

Application of number: level 3

IS House Buying – a Good Idea or Not?

A table to show the data collated for the samples for other houses and first-time buyers’ houses (in ascending order):

Other houses

Price (£)

First-time buyers' houses

Price (£)

1

32,500

1

18,500

2

35,000

2

29,950

3

37,950

3

37,500

4

39,950

4

39,500

5

44,950

5

39,950

6

46,250

6

39,950

7

54,950

7

39,950

8

64,950

8

41,950

9

64,950

9

43,950

10

65,000

10

44,950

11

71,950

11

46,500

12

74,950

12

46,950

13

82,500

13

49,950

14

87,500

14

50,950

15

89,950

15

51,950

16

94,950

16

51,950

17

110,000

17

52,500

18

110,000

18

52,995

19

131,950

19

53,000

20

139,500

20

54,950

21

145,000

21

54,950

22

145,000

22

55,950

23

149,950

23

57,950

24

175,000

24

69,500

25

175,000

25

69,950

26

195,000

26

70,950

27

195,000

27

72,950

28

210,000

28

79,500

29

215,000

29

79,950

30

249,950

30

84,950

The mean of a set of data is the sum of the values divided by the number of values.

        Mean = sum of values / number of values

The range is a measure of spread and the range of a set of data is the difference:

                Greatest value – least value

First-time buyers’ houses:

  • Mean:         Sum of house prices / 30

= £1,584,445 / 30

= £52,815 (to the nearest £)

  • Range:        highest house price – lowest house price

= £84,950 – £18,500

= £66,450 (to the nearest £)

        Other houses:

  • Mean:         Sum of house prices / 30

= £3,334,600 / 30

= £111,153 (to the nearest £)

  • Range:        highest house price – lowest house price

= £249,950 – £32,500

= £217,450 (to the nearest £)

All houses:

  • Mean:         Sum of house prices / 60

= £4,919,045/ 60

= £81,984 (to the nearest £)

  • Range:        highest house price – lowest house price

= £249,950 – £18,500

= £231,450 (to the nearest £)

All of the calculations have been double checked in order to ensure that they are correct. The data in the tables of the samples was arranged in ascending order in order to be able to easily recognise the highest and lowest values required for calculating the range. The calculations for the means are seemingly correct since they are similar to mean values provided by the Internet. It can be quite simply proved that the mean for all houses is correct as:

...read more.

Middle

In order to produce the cumulative frequency graphs (for first-time buyers’ houses, other houses and all houses), a cumulative frequency table needs to be made, organising the house prices in ascending order.

First-time buyers’ houses:

House price (£0000)

Cumulative frequency

Less than      0

0

1

0

2

1

3

2

4

7

5

13

6

23

7

25

8

29

9

30

Other houses:

House price (£)

Cumulative frequency

Less than   0

0

1

0

2

0

3

0

4

4

5

6

6

7

7

10

8

12

9

15

10

16

11

16

12

18

13

18

14

20

15

23

16

23

17

23

18

25

19

25

20

27

21

27

22

29

23

29

24

29

25

30

...read more.

Conclusion

Accuracy of the graphs and charts were ensured by carrying out the following:

  • Using tick marks with lower intervals
  • Adding values above bars (on Excel software) and ensuring that they correspond to the data in each of the sample tables.

According to the data for all houses the average house price in my survey (i.e. £81,984) is lower than the average house price for my region (i.e. £88,700). Evidently this difference is not very considerable.

The difference could be due to the following:

  • Lack of demand as Leicester may have less to offer as a city (e.g. employment, education, leisure and recreation, low crime rates etc.)
  • Inaccuracies in selecting the house prices for the sample, which may be caused by not including enough data or ineffective selective sampling (due to data being selected too randomly).

However the average house price (for all houses) in my survey generally tends

be similar to that of the UK (£81,800).

Generally I think that buying a house in my local area would be a good investment due to the following reasons:

  • Average Leicester house prices being only relatively slightly above the national average.
  • Leicester house prices having the tendency to increase relatively considerably by about 26% within 2 years.

...read more.

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