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Comparative Newspaper Project

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Introduction

Statistics Coursework Comparative Newspaper Project In this investigation I am going to look at the difference between two types of newspaper: tabloids, and broadsheets. I could compare the number of letters in a word, the proportion of text to images, or the perhaps the number of words with 3 or more syllables, but I have chosen to compare the lengths of sentences. This is because I think broadsheets will have longer sentences on average, as they are more 'intellectual' newspapers. They are not like tabloids that are easy to dip into for news for busy working class people, but are there specifically for people who want to, and have the time to, to read the news fully, and in more depth. In addition, this will not be too complicated to find out, as, for example, finding the proportion of text to images is more open to error. For this investigation I am going to take a sample size of 175 for two different newspapers, one national tabloid, and one national broadsheet, the parent population being sentence lengths in national daily newspapers across the country. I'm assuming that all broadsheets and all tabloids are similar. I've used a sample size of 175, as it is large enough to be reasonably accurate, but not too large that it would take too long to collect the data. ...read more.

Middle

However, the data from both newspapers is slightly positively skewed. To look at this in more detail, I will draw a frequency density graphs. Frequency Density Graphs: Telegraph: Class Interval f From To Class Width F.D. 0 - 9 35 -0.5 9.5 10 35 / 10 = 3.50 10 - 14 23 9.5 14.5 5 23 / 5 = 4.60 15 - 19 26 14.5 20.5 5 26 / 5 = 5.20 20 - 24 23 20.5 24.5 5 23 / 5 = 4.60 25 - 29 25 24.5 29.5 5 25 / 5 = 5.00 30 - 34 18 29.5 34.5 5 18 / 5 = 3.60 35 - 54 25 34.5 54.5 20 25 / 20 = 1.25 Sun: Class Interval f From To Class Width F.D. 0 - 9 24 -0.5 9.5 10 24 / 10 = 2.40 10 - 14 21 9.5 14.5 5 21 / 5 = 4.20 15 - 19 55 14.5 20.5 5 55 / 5 = 11.00 20 - 24 41 20.5 24.5 5 41 / 5 = 8.20 25 - 29 23 24.5 29.5 5 23 / 5 = 4.60 30 - 34 7 29.5 34.5 5 7 / 5 = 1.40 35 - 54 4 34.5 54.5 20 4 / 20 = 0.20 See separate sheet - Frequency Density Graphs These frequency density graphs show that... ...read more.

Conclusion

A limitation that I had was that I only looked at one tabloid and one broadsheet. The newspapers that we selected may not be typical of those kinds of paper, so it would have been an advantage to sample more papers. If I were to repeat this investigation, or extend it I would sample more newspapers, but it was not possible to do it this time because it would be so time-consuming. If it were feasible to collect data like this for many samples, then I'd plot an accurate graph for the means of the means of the sample, which would be normally distributed, as long as the sample were large enough - The Central Limit Theorem states that 'If the sample size is large enough then the distribution of the sample means is approximately Normal, irrespective of the distribution of the parent population.' It would then be easier to predict more accurately the mean of the parent populations. To develop this investigation, I can use the data already collected to find out other information, such as how many sentences from a sample of, say, 100 chosen from a tabloid newspaper at random are 24 lines long or more. To do this I am assuming that the population is normal. X ~ N(18.217, ) Z =0.696257 ?? ?? ?? ?? Sarah Ruston ...read more.

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