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Estimates of a straight line and a curved line

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

1   Y10 GCSE Statistics Investigation

Introduction:

                   The subject I have decided to carry out is an assignment on estimates of a straight line and a curved line. I am going to find out if there is any relationship between the estimates of a straight line and a curved line.

Aims:

My aims are as follows

  1. If you estimate a curved line accurately do you also estimate a straight line correctly?
  2. Are half of all estimates within 10% of the actual measurement?
  3. Do Y10 students have a greater number of pupils within 20% of the median than Y7 pupils?
  4. To find out who is better at estimating straight lines, girls or boys?

I am going to answer these questions in my investigation by using the information I gather and the diagrams I formulate, when the aims are found I will then analyse the results.

Planning:

              I am going to look at the recordings taken from Y7 and Y10, boys and girls. The two factors I am going to investigate are age and gender and their ability to estimate a straight line and a curved line.

...read more.

Middle

% error

Rank of curved line

Rank of straight line

d

d

0

2.5

3.5

1

1

0

5.5

3.5

2

4

8

15

10

5

25

-92

24.5

25

0.5

0.25

0

17

3.5

13.5

182.25

0

5.5

3.5

2

4

-8

5.5

10

4.5

20.25

23

17

20.5

3.5

12.25

23

21

20.5

0.5

0.25

23

22.5

20.5

2

4

8

8

10

2

4

15

13.5

15.5

2

4

-31

13.5

24

10.5

110.25

0

1

3.5

2.5

6.25

-23

19.5

20.5

1

1

-8

2.5

10

7.5

56.25

-15

10

15.5

5.5

30.25

-8

12

10

2

361

-8

5.5

10

4.5

30.25

0

22.5

3.5

19

12.25

-15

10

15.5

5.5

16

23

17

20.5

3.5

0

-15

19.5

15.5

4

16

8

10

10

0

-23

24.5

20.5

4

9.25

Spearman’s Rank = 1-6  d  /n(n  -1) = 1-6*925/25 (25  -1) = 1-5550/15600=1-0.35576923=0.644230769

Girls error

Curved line=38

Straight line=13

Curved line estimate

% error

Straight line estimate

% error

37

3

11

15

40

-5

10

23

24

37

15

-15

32

16

14

-8

44

-16

20

-54

35

8

12.5

4

100

-163

10

23

30

21

18

-38

21

44

12.5

4

28

26

11

15

24

37

14

-8

35

8

10

23

34

11

13

0

32

16

11

15

28

26

16

-23

35

8

10

23

34

11

10.5

19

50

-32

13

0

40

-5

12

8

36

5

15

-15

49

-29

16

-23

43

-13

16

-23

40

...read more.

Conclusion

1" rowspan="1">

-1

1

8.5

19.5

-11

121

11.5

15

-3.5

12.25

21

1.5

19.5

380.25

4.5

6

-1.5

2.25

4.5

11

-6.5

42.25

20

19.5

0.5

0.25

13

19.5

-6.5

42.25

4.5

11

-6.5

42.25

8.5

11

-2.5

6.25

1

19.5

-18.5

342.25

total=2701.5

Spearman’s rank = 1-6   d  /n(n  -1)=1-6*2701.5/25(25  -1)=1-16209/15600=1-1.039038461

From these two pieces of information I can see that there is a strong positive correlation in boys estimates and no correlation in girls estimates. This tells me that boys, when they estimate either curved or straight line accurately, they also estimate the other accurately aswell. With girls this doesn’t happen. When girls estimate one line accurately, they usually estimate the other line badly.

Q2

When the pupils estimate the curved line, do boys and girls in y10 have a greater number of pupils with 20% of the median than Y7’s. I will have to work the % error for both Y10 and Y7’s.  

Curved line estimate

% error

Y7 B+G

Curved line estimate

% error

44

16

3

37

3

38

0

0

36

5

50

32

5

31

18

39

3

0

60

58

35

8

7

30

21

34

11

0

40

5

40

5

3

36

5

56

45

1

30

21

35

8

1

24

37

30

21

3

21

45

50

32

2

35.5

7

35

8

0

44

16

60

58

0

37

3

34

11

0

40

5

32

16

0

24

37

28

26

0

32

16

35

8

2

44

16

34

11

0

35

8

50

32

0

100

163

40

5

0

3

21

36

5

0

21

54

49

29

0

28

26

43

13

3

24

37

40

5

0

35

8

35

8

2

23

56

38

0

5

41

7

I will then have to group the pieces of data to make a cumulative frequency diagram.

Group

Y10 Freq

Y7 Freq

Y10 Cumulative frequency

Y7 Cumulative Frequency

0--4

3

2

3

2

5--9

9

6

12

8

10--14

4

0

16

8

15--19

2

4

18

12

20--24

1

3

19

15

25--29

2

1

21

16

30--34

3

0

24

16

35--39

0

3

24

19

40--44

1

0

25

19

45--49

0

1

25

21

50--54

0

1

25

22

55--59

1

1

26

23

60--64

0

0

26

23

65--69

0

0

26

23

70--74

0

0

26

23

75--89

0

0

26

23

90--94

0

0

26

23

95--99

0

0

26

23

100--104

0

0

26

23

105--109

0

0

26

23

110--114

0

0

26

23

115--169

0

0

26

24

...read more.

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