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Investigating Growth in Stride Length During the Human Growth Stage

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Introduction

Investigating Growth in Stride Length During the Human Growth Stage Aim The aim of this investigation is to test the hypothesis that the stride length of a human being, during its growth stage, increases as they age. I chose to investigate pupils in years 7 and 12 at my school as their ages are far enough apart to produce data that should show significant changes in stride length. This investigation was initially prompted by personal experience, because at age 17 my relatively short legs and stride have caused me problems in driving and purchasing clothes. It would seem that manufactures are not catering for people of my size/age, as they appear to be basing design decisions on data that is producing a 'mean' that discriminates against myself and others. Data Collection The population for my investigation is all the pupils in years 7 and 12 at my school, which is an all girls' school. Restricting my selection to just girls in my school has not sacrificed quality because it would have been misleading to include male measurements in the data as they have very different growth patterns. Also my school has a good representation of girls of the same age ranges. I chose a sample of 30 pupils from each year group using systematic sampling. I chose this method of sampling as simple random sampling would have been very tedious and time consuming because I would have had to number all the pupils in each year and then produce 60 random numbers. ...read more.

Middle

It is obvious from the data that the 'average' stride length for year 7 is lower than for year 12. Analysis Measures of central tendency YEAR7 Mean = 1753.6 30 (spreadsheet used) = 58.5cm (to 1 d.p.) Median = 30+1 = 15.5th measurement, which is 58+58.6 = 58.3cm 2 2 58.5�58.3, which shows that the distribution of the data is symmetrical, since the mean is influenced by extreme values whereas the median is not. YEAR 12 Mean = 1977.8 30 (spreadsheet used) = 65.9cm (to 1 d.p.) Median = 30+1 = 15.5th measurement, which is 66.2+66.4 = 66.3cm 2 2 65.9�66.3, therefore the distribution is symmetrical. Measures of spread YEAR 7 Range = 71-46.6 = 24.4cm Variance = ? (?-58.5)2 30 (calculator used) = 1063.194667 = 35.4 (to 1 d.p.) 30 Standard deviation = V35... = 5.95cm (to 2 d.p) YEAR 12 Range = 76-50.2 = 25.8cm Variance = ? (?-65.9)2 30 (calculator used) = 1080.279 = 36.0 (to 1 d.p.) 30 Standard deviation = V36... = 6.0 (to 1 d.p.) Quartiles YEAR 7 Q2 = median = 58.3CM Q1 = 15+1 = 8th measurement, which is 54.4cm 2 Q3 = 8+15 = 23rd measurement, which is 62.6cm IQR = 62.6-54.4 = 8.2cm YEAR 12 Q2 = median = 66.3CM Q1 = 15+1 = 8th measurement, which is 62.8cm 2 Q3 = 8+15 = 23rd measurement, which is 70.6cm IQR = 70.6-62.8 = 7.8cm Outliers Data which are at least 1.5*IQR beyond the upper or lower quartile are outliers. ...read more.

Conclusion

valuable to many aspects of everyday life Accuracy and refinements The sample size was too small for each group and only shows a small fraction of the population. The sample size for each group should have been 50, which is a ? of the students in each year. My school is an affluent socio-economic group and the pupils by definition will be well feed and looked after, compared to a school in a deprived community where because of dietary and health issues the pupils may not be as well developed. Even though emphasise was placed on walking a normal stride it can be expected that certain people did not walk with their normal stride and could have exaggerated. This could have been improved by making people walk more strides therefore getting into their normal rhythm of walking and then finding the average of one stride. When taking measurements people were able to wear shoes which could affect their stride as I have found that with high healed shoes your stride is restricted. This could have been avoided by making people take off their shoes. The measurements of the 5 strides were not taken to decimal places, which restricts the accuracy of the results. The measurements should have been taken more precisely and to 1 decimal place. Overall the investigation was restricted by the amount of time able to collect data and where I could collect it. If the investigation were extended I would collect data from males and females, people from all different social groups and people of all age ranges. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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