• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

We were set a piece of coursework that involved asking people to guess the line and the angle size that were drawn on a piece of paper.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Estimating lines and angles

The problem- We were set a piece of coursework that involved asking people to guess the line and the angle size that were drawn on a piece of paper.

We had to collect data, analyse it and then draw up a conclusion.

The method- I drew a line on a blank piece of paper and on another blank sheet I drew an angle. I then asked 15 girls and 15 boys from y10 to estimate the line and angle. I didn’t know the sizes at this point so that there was no way I could give people any clues.

When I collected my data it was randomly stratified. This was because I asked any body in my year that I came across I didn’t choose. But it was also stratified in that I made sure I asked 15 boys and 15 girls.

This is the table I will use to collect all my results on:

...read more.

Middle

31.1

m

15

8

8.5

-1

-5.9

5.9

120

122

2

-1.6

1.6

m

15

10

8.5

1.5

17.6

17.6

145

122

-23

18.9

18.9

m

15

7

8.5

-2

-17.6

17.6

160

122

-38

31.1

31.1

f

15

10

8.5

1.5

17.6

17.6

167

122

-45

36.9

36.9

f

15

7

8.5

-2

-17.6

17.6

135

122

-13

10.7

10.7

f

15

7.5

8.5

-1

-11.8

11.8

150

122

-28

23.0

23.0

f

15

7

8.5

-2

-17.6

17.6

150

122

-28

23.0

23.0

m

15

8

8.5

-1

-5.9

5.9

130

122

-8

6.6

6.6

m

15

9

8.5

0.5

5.9

5.9

120

122

2

-1.6

1.6

...read more.

Conclusion

I supported my hypothesis further by calculating the average percentage error for the angle and the line. I did this by using the absolute value columns in my table, here are the results:

Line: 18.2

Angle: 14.0

As you can see the average percentage error for the angle was lower than the average percentage error for the line. This does support my hypothesis further and proves people do find it easier to estimate angles than lines.

I think the person who estimated the line correctly was just lucky rather than skilled because the line wasn’t a whole number so it shouldn’t have been easy to estimate. However, it was a simple decimal with it being 5 which is a sensible decimal to estimate.

I don’t think that the angle wasn’t very easy to estimate either as I put it on a slant so that it would be harder to work out 90°.

...read more.

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Probability & Statistics section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Probability & Statistics essays

  1. GCSE Mathematics Coursework: Statistics Project

    watched: 1.5 Min. watched: 1 Max. watched: 40 Max. watched: 40 I now have enough information to construct the box and whisker diagrams. This is an effective statistical method to use, as it will allow me to successfully compare the data for the average amount of TV watched per week for girls and boys.

  2. I am investigating how well people estimate the length of a line and the ...

    select my data of people's estimates for usage in hypothesis 1 and 2 using stratified random sampling. I intend to do this by sampling 20% of each strata, in these cases gender and year group. Once I have worked out what proportion of each strata I need to sample I

  1. Guestimate - investigate how well people estimate the length of lines and the size ...

    9 + 14 = 31 Therefore 7.7, 13.5 or 8.6 must be rounded down depending on which is closest to the lower whole number. 13.5 is closest to its lower whole number (13) so this is the one that is rounded down.

  2. "The lengths of lines are easier to guess than angles. Also, that year 11's ...

    These tables are there so that I can find the mean from grouped data. Also, because the data is put into groups it is easier to handle. I will also find out the spread of the data from the mean using standard deviation.

  1. Statistics coursework

    Following this I will set to prove that year 7's KS2 results are higher than year 11's KS2 results. I shall do this in the same way I proved the first part of my hypothesis. I will start with a cumulative frequency graph of year 7's KS2 results and year 11's too.

  2. DATA HANDLING COURSEWORK

    I will use these graphs to predict what the weight or height of a student would be. I will use cumulative frequency graphs to make comparative generalised statements about heights and weights of students across all of the strata. The cumulative frequency graphs allow you to predict percentages of students within a given range.

  1. Statistics Coursework

    the age of the students and their attendance figures at school or there is no relationship at all. However, the students' appreciation of the importance of their attendance figures does and this is why (in my opinion) the attendance figures vary between students.

  2. Intermediate Maths Driving Test Coursework

    Hypothesis 1: The more lessons you take, the fewer mistakes you will make. This is the assumed thought that with practice you will improve so I will plot my sample's data onto a scatter graph which will allow me to see if there is a strong negative correlation which I would expect.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work