• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An investigation Into The Different Marketing Language of Holiday Brochures For Different Age Groups.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An investigation Into The Different Marketing Language of Holiday Brochures For Different Age Groups Introduction: In my language investigation I will be looking into the similarities and differences between the ways in which holidays for young people (Club 18-30), families (First Choice Summer Sun) and the more mature couples (Forever Young) are marketed toward their specific target audience. I will be researching the different linguistic ideals, which are attached to each holiday. A holiday is after all more than just a product; it is a set of ideals and principles that reflect life-style choices. This makes the linguistic analysis for each catalogue interesting. Each potential buyer will only buy holidays that boast the interests and expectations of the buyer; for example, a sun worshipper would look for beaches and a sightseer will look for views. So different brochures are for different markets. I am expecting that the brochures will have differences in graphology, lexis, and pragmatics. Each target audience will exhibit different principles and look for different aspects within their ideal holiday. I am interested in brochures that are aimed at different age groups. The brochures offer holidays to the same towns around Gran Canaria, Costa Blanca in Spain and Cyprus. To ensure control, I will only be looking into hotels that have been granted the same star ratings (2-3 star) in the same resort, and if possible the exact same hotels. In rare situations, despite their different clientele the travel companies surprisingly use the same hotels. I will then be able to investigate further into the descriptions of same towns and same star hotels (and possibly the same hotels), but which are aimed at different age groups. When the same hotel appears in more than one brochure, I shall linguistically scrutinize the different unique selling points the travel agent has used. I will compare the brochures descriptions in detail and see how the same place is targeting different audiences linguistically as well as graphologically. ...read more.

Middle

used as it could also be implying cordiality." Rich" is used to refer to the fertile countryside but as the word also means wealth the connotations of warmth and richness are very desirable. Summer Sun introduces Cyprus as the birthplace of "The legendary goddess of love, an island of immense natural beauty... clear blue seas". The connotations here are surprisingly of a romantic nature. This is shown by the semantic field of romance. Within the quotation we can see the words "love" and "beauty" portraying this. This could be to appeal to couples that still want to recapture the mood of days gone by despite having families. Club 18-30 has a paragraph which gives no description of location, but of nightlife, for example "Massive dance scene... 5kms of golden sands and crystal clear waters.", This could be because the target audience are more bothered about the nightlife than the surroundings of the accommodation. In their introductions to Cyprus, the objectives of Forever Young and Summer Sun are to describe the features of the island and its ambience in hope that the language will sell a holiday. The connotations are of peace and tranquillity e.g. In Summer Sun "Gently shelving safe sands" and "the cool pine clad Troodos Mountains" and in Forever Young "Picturesque coastal resorts" and "Superb beaches and offers tranquillity" However in club 18-30, the connotations are of fun and sex! Phrases such as "gagging with excitement" are used to entice the reader. Gagging literally means choking, but it is a modern slang term and in this context, the editor expects the reader to think of "gagging" as anticipating something uncontrollably. Below, I have made a table showing how I have calculated the average paragraph length with the amount of adjectives per sentence. This can then indicate which brochure relies upon descriptions and mental imagery the most to sell the holidays on offer. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is far more noticeable between Club 18-30 and the other two brochures. The editor of Club 18-30 expects that intertextual allusions will be perceived by their readers and seen as an attraction. On the whole the choices of language and expression create a particular style inspired by the contextual circumstances. Club 18-30 is dominated by photographic images, which may be seen as more enticing to younger generations. Forever Young and Summer Sun rely more on a combination of text and image. It is surprising to find out that in Club 18-30, the association between the company's reputation, the photographs and the text is very close. Club 18-30 are not trying to hide anything or show any misleading factors about the holidays offered. Literally, what you see is what you get, and the company accepts that. Summer Sun and Forever Young are being presented by reputable companies (First Choice and Thomas Cook) with large market shares. This is then surprising that the photos on the front covers appear not to correspond with the photographs of the accommodation, or with the descriptive texts. I conclude that all brochures do meet the requirements of all the target audiences, but Forever Young isn't as exclusive as it thinks that it is. No single brochure was superior to the other in design. Each brochure addressed its target audience effectively. However, the target audience for one brochure may think that the brochure targeted at them is superior, but that is only from their personal point of view e.g. the Forever Young target audience may be offended by Club 18-30's brochure. Colloquial expressions are commonly used in Club 18-30, but this would just not be accepted in the Forever Young brochure, as it is far more formal. But linguistically, all the brochures are on a par and are effective for their audience. This to me is proof that the editors of the brochures have expectations of their target audiences; their knowledge, hopes and aspirations. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Advertisements section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Advertisements essays

  1. Produce a marketing strategy for a product or service with a clear understanding of ...

    But then those younger people will get older, and some of the C1s, C2s and Ds may get promotion to the point where they can afford your car. Age and social grade classifications do not work precisely but they help the advertiser to get reasonably close to the audience I

  2. Contrasting Static Advertisments. The advertisements that have been selected for this language study ...

    The fact that the only thing available to read in this static is the bottle, this promotes the flavour of vodka straight away, as a consumer is more likely to recall the name of the vodka if there are no other distractions on the advertisement.

  1. Media Analysing 2 holiday adverts, india and disneyland paris

    In advert two the writer uses imagination as he us quoting the relaxing things that the reader could do on the holiday such as "let your friends think you're terribly adventurous." The writer also gives information on the history of the resort and all the facilities that it contains "you'll

  2. Free essay

    Marketing Strategy for Errol Anderson Motors - Chapter 1: The Different Types of Marketing ...

    They do not live in the same area as Errol Anderson Motors and not all of them are car owners. Also, the price above is only for broadcasting a commercial. An advertiser would need special recording equipment, actors and a well though script to have any success.

  1. Viral Marketing

    The Commercial message will be less peripheral and more involving with information being part and parcel with the program with which the individual is interacting. 4. Finally, in terms of style and substance, the "commercial" message will move from glib and superficial titillation with intangible rewards to substantive value-added "infotainment" with immediate and tangible rewards.

  2. Create ing your own business - create a full plan on a business of ...

    have tried to make an exception for some days holidays and I have advertised throughout those days in small 10seconds adverts. I do not think that there was enough money given originally to start with when I look at the cost now.

  1. Media Marketing Plan

    are as follows: Accuracy; Opportunity to reply; Privacy; Harassment; Intrusion into grief or shock; Children; Children in sex cases; Hospitals' Reporting of crime; Misrepresentation; Victims of sexual assault; Discrimination; Financial journalism; Confidential sources; Witness payments in criminal trials; and Payment to criminals.

  2. Marketing Media and Audience Feedback

    certain topics, but to obtain unique findings on the topic in which they will be provided. SECTION 1: ASSESSMENT OBJECTIVE 1 ANALYSE THE MARKETING MIX FOR EXISTING MEDIA PRODUCTS * Marketing mix: o Product - design/content o Price - retail, ticket, subscriptions, special offers o Place - distribution through retail

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work