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Analyse and compare two tabloid newspapers - one 'quality' and one 'popular'

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Introduction

Analyse and compare two tabloid newspapers - one 'quality' and one 'popular' TABLOIDS are the newspapers that are printed on an A3 size of paper and contain more than just news and world events. In a tabloid, the news shares the content along with sports, advertisements and other features. In this part of my coursework, I plan to evaluate and compare the front pages of two British tabloid newspapers. THE DAILY EXPRESS For my analysis, I have chosen the published copy of the Daily Express dated 14th May 2004. The main photograph on the front page occupies around 20% of the whole side. The photo is of a well-recognised personage, Victoria Beckham. She is wearing designer clothes, dark glasses, and carries a handbag. She stands on a tiled floor. The sophisticated designers wear of the woman connotates her wealth; we also learn of her fame from her presence on the front page of the paper. The lighting of the photograph is on this woman; the background has been kept dark and mysteriously unknown. We can tell that the setting of the picture is negligible, as the photographer has deliberately left the background unfocused. The tiled floor gives the connotation of a public place. The unimportant setting is also realized from the proportions of the picture; the figure of the woman fills most of the frame, leaving as little background as possible. The woman's expressions are not very positive; the picture is a snatch photograph where the subject is unaware of the photographer and hasn't posed. ...read more.

Middle

It is the photograph of a woman standing all alone in a very big stadium. She is not an acknowledged person. Her face is expressionless with her chin held high. She wears simple clothes with ordinary colours and no accessories. Her hair has been tied back in a rough, clumsy manner. The proportions of the stadium to the woman are huge. This gives the reader the connotation that the setting of the photograph is much, much more important than the subject in it. This is also realised from the fact that the woman is not a well-known person. The photographer has wanted to make the reader focus on the location of the picture. The expressions on the woman's face are rigid, and her body, stiff. In vast vicinity, she is the only person the reader can see. Although she stands at the centre of a huge stadium, we are given the impression that she does not have the freedom of moving about. The woman has posed for the photograph and looks straight into the camera. A caption has been used underneath the picture, telling us its location and about the subject in it. It also tells us why it has been taken so that a person who sees the picture can read the caption and decide if they are interested in reading the article that it is linked to. The Times is very different from the Daily Express. The Daily Express has tried to catch the attention of its audience by putting the image of a popular celebrity on the front-page so that people get curious to know what all they can find out about her. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, the Times tells the reader about a vital event taking place in the world. In the entire front-page editorial of the Daily Express, the reader only learns of the event and the people associated with it. The Times, on the other hand, tell us what the event is, its history, its causes, consequences and what is being done about it. The news of the Daily Express is more personal than the Times, which gives a broader view of a big world event. The article of the Daily Express begins with a stand first. A person will only get to know of the people involved in the issue by reading the first paragraph; to find out the whole story, they will need to read the whole item. In contrast to this, the Times gives its readers the most important information at the very beginning and the readers, then being knowledgeable about the event, can choose whether or not to carry on reading. Overall, the Daily Express has made its front-page very appealing and the Times has published theirs closer to a broadsheet. The following table compares the overall content of the Times and Daily Express :- THE TIMES THE DAILY EXPRESS NEWS 60% 45% FEATURES 18% 10% ADVERTISEMENTS 10% 10% SPORT 10% 25% OTHER 2% 10% A 'quality' tabloid follows all the traits of a tabloid newspaper, but its news content is a shortened version of the same broadsheet paper. Alternatively, a 'popular' tabloid doesn't give very much of news, especially on the front page. It is more concerned in making its front-page eye-catching, to make more of the public buy it. ...read more.

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