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Analysis of Hollyoaks Title Sequence.

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Introduction

Analysis of Hollyoaks Title Sequence At the beginning of the programme, before the title sequence rolls in, there is already the first difference from many soap operas on commercial television. Whereas the likes of Coronation Street and Emmerdale and others on commercial based television, Hollyoaks does not have a sponsor, instead it has a now and next screen, and has a voice over of a slight summary of one of the storylines that happens. I believe that this could be done to encourage people to stay tuned in and watch the programme. I believe that by having this slight summary could swing either way. Yes it could encourage watching viewers to see how the storyline unravels, but it could also turn potential viewers away. If they know some of the episode and that doesn't appeal to them, then instead of watching like they were going to, they may tune into another channel. ...read more.

Middle

No, instead they have a centre real of micro-clips. In a circular motion, there are two clips at a time, scrolling from the bottom of the screen to the top and out of the picture. I really like this idea; it introduces you to the characters, without letting you know their details. Also as I mentioned they are slips not freeze frames, thin means that you don't have to use your imagination to find out what their like, or watch the episode to know their personalities, that's all covered in these short clips. Each/most character has their own couple of clips and this introduces the way they are and their personalities. I see it as a small window into their minds, it enables you to know what their like, and so you can relate to them or may know someone like them, this is an excellent way to inject realism into the sequence. ...read more.

Conclusion

The main chord as repetitive as it is, is actually quite relaxing, it contradicts the programme, and doesn't follow mainstream title sequences, which are normally high intensity and dramatic all the way through. At the end of the title sequence a different chord, which is very relaxing and quiet gets played, this is to set up for a quiet bit in the programme, never does a episode start with a dramatic part, its always a slightly peculiar beginning, with something like a shot of the main location, or someone sitting, something very ordinary and mundane. This is again to inject realism into the show and acts as a "quiet before the storm" scenario. There is normally quiet from the characters with some background music/noise and then the drama starts. ...read more.

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