• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Compare the persuasive techniques used in the two charity fundraising advertisements. Which advertisement do you think is more effective and why?

Extracts from this document...


Assignment. Friday, 05th,November,2004 Compare the persuasive techniques used in the two charity fundraising advertisements. Which advertisement do you think is more effective and why? The hardest thing for any charity is to raise money. There is only one way to do this, that is to persuade people to part with their money and donate it to a good cause. The " Bhopal Medical Appeal" and "Save The Children" advertisements are two examples of this. Both of these advertisements come from " The Observer" a broadsheet newspaper. Consequently it is assumed that the target audience is those of a higher education and people who more likely to actually read the advertisement. In both of the advertisements they use very different persuasive techniques. It is easy to see how the two advertisements, both need and want the same thing: the readers' help. However, in many various ways, it is clear that the "Save The Children" advertisement and the "Bhopal Medical Appeal" advertisement have distinct ways of reaching out for the readers attention and support. First of all " Just 10p a day" is used throughout the 'Save The Children' advertisement. This sticks in the reader's mind and makes them remember the words "Just 10p a day", then makes the reader think what their "10p a day" could do to help save children's lives. ...read more.


A remarkable persuasive media technique is the use of the pronoun "you". It immediately makes the reader feel involved, as it seems as if the advertisement was directed at them, therefore, making it appear to be much more personal. Both advertisements use this; in the "Save The Children" advertisement it asks "Will you give 10p a day?" and in the "Bhopal" advertisement it states: "We don't ask 'you' to help 'us' to help 'them'. 'We' is all of us together" The "Save The Children" advertisement uses this technique much more successfully as it is short and gets straight to the point. Related to this technique is the use of the present tense. "will you give just 10p a day. Now?" The use of the word "now" in the present tense, urges the reader to do something that instant. Making them think that people need their help right now. In the "Save The Children" advertisement the present tense is also used; "please will you help us save more children form poverty by completing the direct debit form attached to this letter today?". Therefore "today" and "now" show the use of the present tense. It is also used in the "Bhopal medical appeal" advertisement, "free phone 0800 316 557 now." Again "now" is the use of the present tense. ...read more.


In conclusion, both advertisements used some similar techniques of persuasive media and some completely different techniques of persuasion. They are both appealing for your sympathy and help. However, the 'Save The Children' advertisement is much more effective in comparison to the 'Bhopal Medical Appeal'advertisement, because it uses a number of various techniques, such as: rhetorical questions, use of the pronoun 'you' to involve the reader, and finally strong emotive words. Another point could be that the 'Bhopal Medical Appeal' advertisement had a long story; the problem with this is although you want to make your point, people are less likely to read a story that may be touching, only to find that the advertisement wants their money. On the other hand the 'Save The Children' advertisement does have some long written text in parts. The advertisement, however, is straight to the point, it immediately informs the reader of what they would like, letting the reader know what to expect, therefore the reader knows that if they continue to read their help will be needed. The 'Save The Children' advertisement uses media features much more successfully than 'Bhopal Medical Appeal.' Emotive images are used showing numerous close ups of children's faces. 'Save The Children' itself suggests that the children are in danger and that your contribution can help. Therefore, the 'Save The Children' advertisement is more effective. Kirsty Nichol - 10A ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our AS and A Level Advertisements section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related AS and A Level Advertisements essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    Discuss techniques used in charity advertising with specific reference to particular examples and case ...

    4 star(s)

    the text at the bottom of the screen, which says "among other things" after mentioning children are often also subjected to issues such as violence, homelessness. The "among other things" is also connotative. This is very disturbing and parents could sympathise with the advert, as they would not want that young girl to be their daughter or son.

  2. Show how charity advertisements persuade the public to support them.

    In the second paragraph it says "You can change this" This directly addresses the reader, it gets the reader involved and tries to convince the reader that his/her help is urgently needed to change Nzikus' life and give her the basics of life including her clothing and medicine.

  1. Choose two advertisements that are closely related. Compare and contrast the two advertisements.

    "As soon as you plug it in, the performer can run educational titles, encyclopaedias, atlases and games. They all work, first time." Its appeal to the reader is very strong. It makes the reader comfortable about computers. I think the advert is appealing to people who find it hard to use computers.

  2. Marketing Media and Audience Feedback

    They place their 'booths' along busy high streets to attract customers, where motorway service stations tend to be equally successful as many motorway drivers often visit them during different times of the day. Examples of distribution through retail outlets include Morrisons, ASDA, Tesco and Sainsbury's.

  1. Compare and Contrast the Oxfam 'Cut Conflict' Advertisement and the CCF Advertisement.

    Language is particularly important in media and advertising. The use of powerful emotional language is profoundly evident in the use of charity advertising. The Oxfam advertisement headline uses the clich� 'Look me in the eye and tell me that arms controls are tough enough', this is a clever piece of

  2. Analysis of the Guinness TV Advertisement Tipping Point

    The music continues its lively pass throughout. The sounds of cheering and laughing can also be heard so we know the community is enjoying their work and effort. This is emphasized by the many cuts shots to the faces and people of the community as me see joy and smiles on their faces.

  1. How Media Texts Persuade Us.

    Heroism is when the man rescues the young girl from the approaching lorry. The implication is this that if you buy a Peugeot car, you can live a heroic lifestyle. A modern lifestyle is conveyed when the woman impulsively jumps across the table to seduce and perhaps propose to the man.

  2. The first part is to compare and evaluate two competitor organisations strategies of their ...

    You can see the Calvin Klein logo. The writing style is Times New Roman for the logo. If this logo is showned to the public they would recognise it and also they don't need to find out what CK means as it written within the logo the name Calvin Klein with the writing style as Verdana .

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work